How to be an Interpreter: Advice for Newcomers

interpreting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interpreting as a career is competitive but rewarding and the demand for interpreters to bridge the language barrier between people and professionals is in high demand, all over the world.

If you are completely new to this and want to know what it takes to get into this field, our 5 steps on how to become an interpreter will send you on your way.

1) Self Evaluate: Is this career path really for you? You need to consider all factors within this job role. What does it entail exactly and how are you going to find work? Can you remain impartial throughout the assignments? Doing extensive research into the field is advised before you jump straight into it. Interpreting can be harder than it looks. 

 

2) Qualifications: You will need an interpreting qualification to become a professional interpreter. The qualifications include the Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting and the Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting. You may also need a certain level of experience and qualifications to work in certain sectors. Research the different interpreting qualifications on offer and how you can obtain these. Researching different education centres will be handy as well as not every centre will fit your wants and needs – for example, we provide mainly distance learning. Writing a development plan may help as you will create some realistic goals when you will be able to start working as an interpreter. 

 

3) Volunteering: Have you got a sufficient amount of experience in Interpreting? Volunteering for your local public services or charities such as the refugee council can be helpful for your community and it can also provide you with great experience. This experience can be applied and used when signing up to different agencies and it will increase your earning potential. If you are looking for organisations that are currently taking on volunteer interpreters, depending on your location, Nottingham University Hospital are accepting.

 

4) Freelance Business: Do you want to work for yourself or through an agency? What do you need to do to be able to set up your own freelance company or to establish yourself as a sole trader? If you would rather work for yourself, as a freelancer, you need to know how to set this up and what makes a good freelance business. Our Introductory Business courses are packed with advice on how to run a successful freelance interpreting or translation business.  Click here.

 

5) Finding Work:  Which areas do you want to specialise in? How far are you prepared to travel to an assignment? What rates are you prepared to work for? You need to decide on the type of work you want to undertake as an interpreter for example: NHS work or Police work. You need to have realistic goals and expectations based on your experience and qualifications and what income you want to get from the job. You also need to consider the area you live in and the languages you speak. There may not be much demand for interpreting services for your language in the area you are currently based. It will be worth considering how far you are willing to travel for an assignment.

So if you want to start your career as an interpreter – what are you waiting for? Use this guide to help you make your first steps into this challenging and rewarding line of work. If you have any further questions about what qualification to take why not email the team at info@islinguists.com.

Posted in Uncategorized.