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court room, council chambers

LEEDS BASED COMPANY BREAKS UP CONTROL OF THE LINGUIST QUALIFICATION MARKET

The International School of Linguists (ISL) is widening access to the Diploma in Public Service Interpreting (DPSI), making it affordable for the first time and increasing the frequency of examinations from once or twice per year to every month. ISL’s aim is to increase the number and quality of linguists who are available to deliver services to British hospitals, courts and other vital public services.

ISL, the UK’s leading provider of interpreter qualifications, has teamed up with Training Qualifications UK, an awarding organisation recognised by the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation, to deliver the highly regarded qualification. TQUK award over 310 qualifications across 8 sectors and provide more interpreting qualifications than any other Awarding Organisation.

Until recently, the DPSI qualification was offered by a sole provider and in the opinion of many of our interpreters the route to qualification was restrictive in terms of languages, locations, timetables and cost.

The ISL qualification includes all of the same standards as our competitor, however, ISL is making it more widely available. From today, exam dates will be available every month of the year, and available from anywhere in the UK, in over 200 languages. We have also ensured that the qualification is more affordable. In addition, the ISL qualification is the only DPSI to offer all 5 units at level 6, making it the highest standard DPSI available.

Independence and fairness are at the heart of everything ISL does, that’s why we work with an Ofqual-regulated TQUK. Working with an independently owned, awarding organisation means that the quality of our qualification is guaranteed.

ISL General Manager, Robert Mynett, said: “The DPSI is a well-regarded qualification and has been producing the highest quality interpreters for many years. Following feedback from our interpreters, we are delighted that we can now improve accessibility, frequency, and affordability for interpreters across the UK.

Andrew Walker Managing Director at TQUK said: “We are delighted to have been approached by ISL and others within the interpreting sector to develop this new, exciting alternative to the established DPSI qualification.

Speaking to expert practitioners and training delivery staff during the development process, it quickly became apparent that the sector was crying out for a more flexible approach to assessment which removed barriers to learning and achievement, allowing more people to undertake this valuable qualification.  We have applied tried and tested vocational assessment methodologies to this qualification and are proud to be able to use our expertise to meet a need in the marketplace as identified by our subject experts and existing centres.

This qualification is rigorous, robust and reliable. We are confident that upon achievement learners will find themselves in possession of the highly specialist skills required and desired by the legal profession. We look forward to awarding our first certificates soon.

ISL was established in 2010 as a provider of training and testing that specialises in the language services industry. Over the last seven years we have grown to become the UK’s leading provider of interpreter qualifications and delivers quality provision to hundreds of students.

Do you have questions regarding our DPSI? Ring the team on 0800 757 3475 or email us on info@islinguists.com.

Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting – what options should I pick?

This is one of the most common questions we get asked here at ISL and there is no right or wrong answer. You can pick whatever options you please. However, for those students wanting to undertake the more higher paid, demanding and complex assignments such as the Police and Courts, there are certain options that we would recommend to increase your opportunities.

Our Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI) is a vocational qualification which means you are assessed continuously throughout your studies via written and practical assessments. Your course and assessments are an all-in-one approach rather than a one off pass or fail exam; as long as you complete all the work involved to the specified criteria, you get your certificate, period.

Within the DCI, you have to complete six mandatory modules, including Consecutive Interpreting and Simultaneous Interpreting. You then have the opportunity to select up to four specialist units ranging from Financial and Business Interpreting to Court and Police Interpreting. Our students get the chance to mix and match their qualification to their specific needs and wants. For example, if you want to be an Interpreter in the Mental Health settings but also want to explore Conference Interpreting, you can pick the optional units that support these goals.

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We often get questions from our students asking what optional units they should pick if they want to get the most out of their Interpreting career. The answer to this would be the Law options. This consists of:

  • Interpreting in Police Settings
  • Interpreting in Court Settings
  • Interpreting in the Prison/Probation Service
  • Supporting Interpreting through Draft Written Translations From and Into English

Completing these modules will allow you to work on the MoJ register at the highest level, become a member on the NRPSI register and work on all available Interpreting assignments within the UK. If you want to work on NHS, Mental Health Interpreting or any other assignments, these optional modules will allow you to do so, however, if you do not study the modules above(say you took health interpreting instead of police) you WILL NOT be able to work within law settings. Worth thinking about.

For these reasons, when students ask us which optional units are the best ones to pick we usually advise students to undertake the Law options, even if they plan on doing other Interpreting work, so they can fulfil their potential within their Interpreting career.

If you would like to view our Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI), please click here.

If you have any questions or wish to speak to the team please contact us on info@islinguists.com or 08007573475.

This blog is brought to you by Tess Wilkinson, Learning and Development Specialist at ISL.

 

 

Partnership Promises New Standards for Interpreters

A new partnership is promising to raise standards for interpreters used by companies and public sector organisations across the globe.

The International School of Linguists (ISL), based in Leeds, has announced a formal partnership with the Association of Certified Interpreters (ACCI), a global organisation providing skilled interpreters.

The partnership aims to improve the quality and skill levels for interpreters using ISL’s recognised course base for all ACCI members. Both organisations hope that this will give a better service to users of interpreting services such as the UK National Health System (NHS), the police and large financial firms who work across borders, but that it should also lead to better pay and conditions for interpreters who sign up.

lSL students will receive a reduced membership fee with ACCI in their first year. In exchange, ISL will provided quality CPD training workshops to ACCI members at a reduced rate.

 

Speaking about the new partnership, ISL Chief Executive Ilan Gould said: “ACCI is a fantastic partner and we share a commitment not only to delivering the best for our industry but also for a strong, supportive union of interpreters who are often the unsung heroes; smoothing the way in global trade and assisting in the delivery of vital public services such as the NHS. Interpreters even help support troops and make combat zones safer for armed forces personnel and civilians.

“A commitment to further professional development across the industry is essential to deliver for future needs; equipping interpreters themselves with a wider array of knowledge so they can focus their talents in an increasingly complex market and meeting the needs of highly specialist organisations and industries. We want to make sure we’re positioned with the right skills for the future and together, ISL and ACCI are meeting those challenges.”

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Pawel Janicki, a founder and the CEO of the ACCI said:

"I trust ISL will provide opportunities for CPD for our members and we have made Continuing Professional Development a requirement for all certified interpreters. Language interpreting is a profession which requires robust qualifications and commitment to professional standards and CPD. The ACCI’s vision is to unite language interpreters. By delivering our outcomes on behalf of our members we aim to lead the profession in high standards, quality and innovation. Our mission is to make the ACCI essential for professional interpreters, businesses and organisations and to be at the heart of leading the change in the profession."

"Language interpreters help to deliver frontline public services and they need the support and appropriate level of remuneration to guarantee public safety. Interpreters bridge the cultural and language gap and help with building community cohesion for harmonious communication between service users and limited English speakers."

"The ACCI and ISL partnership is the correct step towards this and we are looking to make more quality partnerships and to involve all stakeholders in the future to help achieve these goals."

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For further information or interview opportunities, please contact Robert Mynett, General Manager at ISL, on +44 (0)113 210 7457 or email robert.mynett@islinguists.com.

For more information about the International School for Linguists, please visit: www.islinguists.com

To learn more about the ACCI, visit: www.acciglobal.org

 

 

What Prevents Adults from Learning English?

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Is it possible to learn English in adulthood? What myths prevent us from learning foreign languages and how to achieve quick results? The answers are below!

The older you are, the more tools you can apply to achieve your goals. However, the greatest reason for unwillingness to learn English in adulthood is the next three mis-beliefs discovered by Lucy Adams, one of the British essay writers:

#1 Learning in Adulthood is Much More Complicated

 Children surpass adults only in two aspects:

  1. The ability to acquire the right accent. However, adults are quite capable of achieving the fluency of the native speaker. But even if an adult is more likely to speak with an accent, do not get too upset as it doesn’t prevent other people from understanding you.
  2. Children are free from defeatist thoughts. In other words, they treat learning as a natural process and quickly absorb new

Despite the two above disadvantages, adults can achieve better results through consciousness learning and focus on the process.

#2 Adults Should Learn Foreign Languages in the Same Way as Children Do

The child's brain is different so that one should not expect that children and adults will share the same teaching methods. It is not true. Alas, adults sometimes try to learn the language, abandoning all the strategies and experiences that have helped them to succeed. They are trying to master a foreign language naturally, just as they have mastered their native language. It's impossible. Such attempts inevitably lead to disappointment. The point is to rely on the accumulated cognitive experience and not to try to imitate the children.

 

#3 When Learning a Foreign Language, One Shouldn’t Use the Native Language

Some adult students believe that they should never translate from their native language to a foreign language. However, it deprives them of a free command of their native language. Although not all English phrases can be directly translated, there are many aspects that one can successfully borrow from any language!

For example, an adult native English speaker studying Portuguese would hardly notice that the Portuguese word "insidioso," which describes something gradually harming, resembles the English word "insidious." It's pointless to pretend that the knowledge of Portuguese is useless in this case.

Although sometimes the meaning does not match, it is very useful to look for common concepts, categories, and templates, and this is a great advantage of adult learners over children.

Unfortunately, any of these myths can prevent any adult – even with the highest motivation – from mastering English. A lot of research has been devoted to these incorrect statements, and the results in the field of cognitive science will be useful to all adults studying a foreign language, not just English!

Does it Really Take Twenty-One Days to Form a New Habit?

In 1960, the plastic surgeon Maxwell Moltz published a book called Psycho-Cybernetics: A New Way to Get More Living Out of Life. In it, he stated that a number of phenomena require twenty-one days to change (for example, "people must live in a new place for about three weeks to feel at home"). It is unclear how he received this magic number, but the subsequent studies have shown that the formation of a new habit does not take some fixed period. So focus on the quality rather than on the number of lessons!

Try to make English a significant part of your life. Some textbooks include stickers with words that can be glued to different objects. For example, if you learn Spanish, you can paste a sticker with the word "la cuchara" (a spoon) to the drawer of the kitchen table so that each time when you take a spoon, you will see the word associated with it.

Does the Delay Equal to a Failure?

Despite the best intentions, life always makes adjustments to our plans. You may find that you postponed foreign language classes for several days or even weeks. You may be upset, but that does not mean you should give up!
The formation of new habits is sometimes studied in the context of quitting smoking. The best strategy to predict whether a person will eventually quit smoking is to count the number of times he or she has been able to give up the habit for at least a few days or weeks.

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If you find yourself return to the old habit, do not think that you will not be able to master it. Do not forget that it's easier to learn familiar words than from scratch! Delays don’t lead to a failure until you try!

 

Language Aspects

Although teachers usually try to correct all mistakes, they still get used to your speech style. The teacher knows your accent, vocabulary, as well as the most commonly used grammatical constructions and favourite topics for discussion. That’s why the teacher understands you much better than an unfamiliar native speaker. This phenomenon is called "language proficiency within the Institute." But why is there such a big difference between the use of language in the classroom and the real world? The answer can be found in a phenomenon called "a common platform."

The common platform is typical not only for studying foreign languages. In any conversation, the interlocutors take into account personal and situational factors that they will or will not have in common. In other words, when you are talking to someone, you always take into account things which, according to your opinion, the interlocutor knows and doesn’t know. And now think about how much more difficult is to control a platform with someone belonging to a different culture!

One way to increase the chances that you will be understood outside the class is to think about what you can have in common with the interlocutor. For example, you can start with greetings and courtesies to help the interlocutor get accustomed to your accent.

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Create Memories

The size of our memory is determined by many factors, such as the level of intelligence (people with higher IQ show higher results in the tasks of memorising figures) and mood (people in chronic depression show lower results).

Another important factor is the age. The memory size grows in childhood and ceases to do it closer to 20. However, this s not such a big problem as it may seem at first glance. Adults have much more knowledge of the world than children so that they can apply the division into fragments much more effectively. Age can badly affect the number of memorised figures, but knowledge and experience help to compensate for memory impairment, giving meaning to these figures.

How can it be applied to learning? After listening, students are often asked to repeat it word-by-word. This is a tough task even for children, and with age, it becomes even more difficult. Even when people are asked to do this in their native language, they often fail. Native speakers paraphrase what they hear, preserving the meaning of the phrase, even if they do not use the same words. When foreign language learners try to repeat long passages word-by-word, they rather test their memory than develop their language skills. Adults learn better not by memorising by heart but integrating new concepts and material into the already existing cognitive structures!

Instead of the Conclusion

Remember the basic principle: positive information is processed more efficiently and is remembered better and longer than negative. The superiority of positive information over the negative was demonstrated in numerous studies, including those dealt with the memorisation of words, grammatical constructions, as well as the content of dialogues and texts.
Of course, it’s impossible to use only positively coloured words and sentences, but you can at least approach the process positively. Consider the next two sentences: a) "President is a woman;" b) "President is not a man." The first one will go easier because positive linguistic characteristics are easier to process. The same applies to listeners who will faster understand what you say.

I wish you best of luck in learning English!

 

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Bio
Lucy Adams is an aspiring businesswoman and blogger. Most of all, she’s interested in covering the most intriguing topics of yours, whether they are about business, writing or literature. Share your best ideas with the blogger and get a high-quality guest blog in a week or so!
 

What Do Students Really Think Of ISL?

 

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At ISL, we are really keen on receiving feedback from our customers and students as this allows us to continually grow and develop as a business and improve the services we offer.

 We are delighted to announce that our first Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting student, Elona, has had all of her work signed off and is awaiting her certificates. This is a great milestone for ISL and in light of this amazing success, we are offering you 10% off our Level 6 qualification with this code: feedback10. Please present the code to a member of the ISL team in your telephone discussion.

See what Elona had to say about her studies below:

1) Have you enjoyed the qualification?
Yes, I have enjoyed my qualification. It has been something different studying online.

2) What has been your experience vs. your initial perception of the qualification?
My initial perception of the qualification was that it will be straight forward and easy but I was wrong. The course needs lots of dedication and hard work.

3) Did you progress as well as you hoped prior to making a start?
I think I have done well but I have to mention a few people to thank them for their support: Pam, Robert Teresa and Ajub have been really helpful and professional.

4) What were the biggest challenges you faced?
Knowing my target language in-depth IE: terminology. I never knew how much I can learn.

5) What would you change about your experience?
Overall, It has been great. There were some delays getting everything signed off but I still enjoyed the course. Loved the activities.

6) What did you enjoy most about the qualification?
The online activities and the CPD days where I got to meet other students.

7) Is there anything that you would like to see more or less of in the qualification?
I personally think the assessor plays a key role in the course so having the right assessors working for ISL is key to success. Every student has a different learning style.

8) How has completing this qualification impacted on your life?
It will open more doors for my future.

9) What advice would you give to anyone thinking of taking on this qualification?
Make sure you dedicate enough time for the course.

10) What is next for you?
This certificate will help me a lot to succeed further into the interpreting career, so who knows, I just want to keep climbing stairs of success.

Receive £100 off your ISL Interpreting Qualification

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Have your learning experiences published and win

We are running a competition to find out more about your learning experiences with ISL. Since you studied and achieved an Interpreting qualification with us, we would love to know about your experiences.
 
Have you got any particular experiences you would like to share? What challenges did you face and how did you overcome them? How did you make the style of learning work for you? What opportunities have you managed to find since you graduated?
 
Send your blog to the ISL team and the best student story will be featured on our next newsletter.
Oh and did we also mention that the winning story will receive £100 off their next qualification with ISL?
We will credit your blog and ensure your name is featured within the entry.
We look forward to reading all of your stories!

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T&C's apply: 1 entry per person. Competition ends 14/04/17. Entries should be written on a word document, with your full name, email address and the level of qualification you are currently studying or have studied with ISL. Entries will not be accepted in any other format. By sending ISL your stories, you are agreeing to have them used for marketing and testimonial purposes. The ISL judges decision is final and no correspondence will be entered in to. Winners will be contacted personally. The prize(s) must be taken as stated and cannot be deferred. There will be no cash alternatives. ISL do not accept any responsibility for late or lost entries due to the Internet or postal service. Proof of sending is not proof of receipt. Only one entry will be accepted per person. The deadline for receiving entries for the competition is final. No entries received after the given date will be considered. Prizes unclaimed after 28 days will be deemed to have been forfeited and ISL reserves the right to either offer the prize to the entrant whose name is next drawn at random, or to re-offer the prize in any future competition.

Receive £50 off your ISL Interpreting Qualification

we need you v2

Have your learning experiences published

We are running a competition to find out more about your learning experiences with ISL. If you are currently studying an Interpreting qualification with us, we would love to know about your experiences. Have you got any particular experiences you would like to share? What challenges are you facing and how do you overcome them? How have you made the style of learning work for you? What opportunities have you managed to find since you started?

Send your blog to the ISL team and the best student story will be featured on our next newsletter.

Oh and did we also mention that the winning story will receive £50 off their current qualification with ISL?

We will credit your blog and ensure your name is featured within the entry.

We look forward to reading all of your stories!

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

T&C's apply: 1 entry per person. Competition ends 14/04/17. Entries should be written on a word document, with your full name, email address and the level of qualification you are currently studying or have studied with ISL. Entries will not be accepted in any other format. By sending ISL your stories, you are agreeing to have them used for marketing and testimonial purposes. The ISL judges decision is final and no correspondence will be entered in to. Winners will be contacted personally. The prize(s) must be taken as stated and cannot be deferred. There will be no cash alternatives. ISL do not accept any responsibility for late or lost entries due to the Internet or postal service. Proof of sending is not proof of receipt. Only one entry will be accepted per person. The deadline for receiving entries for the competition is final. No entries received after the given date will be considered. Prizes unclaimed after 28 days will be deemed to have been forfeited and ISL reserves the right to either offer the prize to the entrant whose name is next drawn at random, or to re-offer the prize in any future competition.

Choosing The Right Path For You: Online or Classroom Learning?

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At ISL we have found that this is a very common question. Which is the best way to study: online (also known as distance learning) or classroom? It’s not easy selecting the ideal option as there are many factors to consider; flexibility, travel arrangements, cost etc. Having personal experience studying both online and classroom and working so closely with our Interpreting Qualifications and our students, I can offer some advice for practising Interpreters struggling to choose the right study option for them.

The first factor to consider is Time. Do you have the time to fit a classroom qualification into your schedule? Working full time myself, I know and understand the struggles of having the time to fit everyday life into the short few hours you get to yourself after the working day is done. Some of you may have families to tend which makes timing even trickier. Some of you may be full time Interpreters, meaning your schedule is busy and unpredictable. Keep in mind that if you choose a classroom qualification, you will need to commit to attending on a regular basis, at a certain time each week and it’s not just the time spent at class that you have to plan for, you also need to consider your travel time and time to complete homework assignments. If the answer to my first question is ‘No’, then I would strongly advise looking into an online qualification. Our online Interpreter qualifications are very flexible and accessible. You have the freedom to log in and out of your studies whenever and wherever you like; from your smartphone or your laptop.it everyday life into the short few hours you get to yourself after the working day is done. Some of you may have families to tend which makes timing even trickier. Some of you may be full time Interpreters, meaning your schedule is busy and unpredictable. Keep in mind that if you choose a classroom qualification, you will need to commit to attending on a regular basis, at a certain time each week and it’s not just the time spent at class that you have to plan for, you also need to consider your travel time and time to complete homework assignments. If the answer to my first question is ‘No’, then I would strongly advise looking into an online qualification. Our online Interpreter qualifications are very flexible and accessible. You have the freedom to log in and out of your studies whenever and wherever you like; from your smartphone or your laptop.

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Another factor to consider is your learning preference. How do you like to learn? Are you a visual learner? Do you learn better by being surrounded with peers? Or do you like to get stuck in and learn as you go? All of our online Interpreter qualifications feature an element of all 3 learning styles. We believe that every individual learns and processes information in a different way, so we always try to cater for this. If you find that your motivation to study is low, a classroom learning option might be best here. In a classroom, a teacher or tutor will be present as well as a classroom full of other students, and there is a set schedule for attending these classroom sessions and for completing work. This is a great motivator as you have to attend these sessions, and if you don’t, you will not gain the full qualification. For distance learning, one way around this is to agree deadlines with your assessor and make sure you stick to them.

Do you have the facilities to travel to a physical location? This is an important question to ask, as this alone can be a deciding factor for if a classroom or online qualification is the best option for you. If the classroom location of the qualification is a fair distance from your home, this is off putting and demotivating for many reasons. It could be costly, it could be time consuming, and you may not drive and have to take public transport (which is unreliable at the best of times!). With a distance learning option, all of the time you put aside for your qualification can be spent studying so if travel is an issue, the online option is best for you.

The next factor I would consider is support. How do you like to be supported whilst studying? Do you like to be supported on a 1-2-1 basis, within a group of students or not at all? Many people assume an online qualification comes with no support from a tutor or assessor and, in a lot of cases, this is true. However, at ISL, we provide our students with qualified and experienced assessors. Our assessors provide 1-2-1 support via Skype and email. If you prefer not to have any support and be left to your own devices, this is also an option. You can go through the content of the course by yourself and then discuss your progress with your assessor at the end of each module. If you prefer to work in groups or with a class of students and a teacher, then the classroom learning option should be considered here but remember, you will still be required to work on your own to complete the majority of your assignments.

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Finally, a key consideration for the majority of people is cost. Have you considered the full cost of the qualification such as price of attending, travel costs, childcare costs etc.? For a classroom qualification, you have to consider every single cost you may incur. You may have to take time off work to attend the classroom, which may mean that you do not get paid, if you have children you may need to arrange childcare which is costly. You need to consider the price of transport getting to and from the classroom eg: petrol costs or bus/train fare and finally, you need to look at the overall enrolment cost. The total cost for a classroom qualification is more than likely higher than that of a distance learning qualification because you do not have to consider add on costs for a distance learning qualification. At ISL, the cost of our qualifications cover all learning material, assessment fees and the support from your assessor and language specialist. There is no travel or childcare costs as you can study from the comfort of your own home.

 

Online, or distance learning is becoming increasingly popular and will eventually be the leading and preferred learning method. According to research conducted by the U.S. Department of Education, students undertaking online qualifications or training courses actually perform better than those attending a classroom course.

Why not browse our online interpreting qualifications?

We hope this information will help you to choose your ideal learning method. Do you have a question? Contact us and we would be more than happy to help!

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This blog is brought to you by Tess Wilkinson from the International School of Linguists.

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How to Make Your Child an English-Speaker from Birth, Being a Non-Native Citizen

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Undoubtedly, parents want the best for their children. And that’s why almost every up-to-date adult wants his/her kid to know English, a global language that opens countless opportunities regardless of your origin and place of residence.

Some parents are really obsessed with the idea to start teaching their kids as early as possible. But is it that good to make your kid a bilingual from the very birth? Won’t your baby face troubles in this case?

In this article, I shed light on the problem of learning English depending on the age. Let’s face it: there’s no exact answer to the question of when to start teaching English. However, I’ll consider two options along with their pros and cons. And since you know your child well, I’m sure you’ll be able to decide which of these options suits you.

#1 As Early as Possible

Supporters of this theory say that children from birth to 5-6 years easily learn any language. As kids learn their native language naturally, they can also master any foreign one.

The advantages:

  • Unconscious learning. Kids learn English as a native language; that is, they just passively listen and then reproduce the words and phrases in their speech.
  • The kid is not afraid to speak. At an early age, a child s less afraid to fail than an adult so that he/she boldly uses the studied language. Kids don’t have to overcome the language barrier because they feel themselves free and do not have complexes.
  • Good memory. There is a theory that under-5 children’s language learning abilities are above average because they faster memorise words and phrases. They just repeat everything they hear!
  • Clear speech. It is believed that the child is easier to learn the correct speech because the imitative abilities are at an advanced level.

The disadvantages:

  • The need of immersion. A “natural” way of teaching is possible only if the child is among native speakers. That is, the kid must daily hear the English language from others. This is possible if he/she lives abroad, or at least one of the parents or a babysitter speaks English.
  • The risk of mechanical studying. At the early age, the kid’s native skills are poor so that he/she pronounces sentence automatically, no really understanding the connection between words. Rote memorisation is far from being the most effective method of language learning.
  • Lack of motivation. As the child learns while playing, you need to adjust the conditions accordingly. You’ll have to find a teacher who will be able to teach the child through play and instil him a love of language learning.

So, teaching the child from birth is the best choice if:

  • You are living or going to live in an English-speaking country.
  • At least one person in the family is a native speaker (or fluent in English).
  • You know how to teach in an unobtrusive and interesting manner or find a tutor who knows how to do it

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#2 At the Age of 7 or Later

Proponents of this view believe that foreign languages should be taught in conscious age, not to torment the kid with incomprehensible words. If the child is not in an English-speaking country and his/her parents do not speak English as often as the native language, there’s no point to start the teaching process earlier that at the age of 7.

 

The advantages:

  • Children get used to learning. At the age of 7, most kids are already gets used to the regime as they go to school. Children become more organised and able to learn, do homework, listen to teachers, etc.
  • Children are already fluent in their native language. School-age children have a wide vocabulary and a good command of their native languages. For example, the child understands that it is necessary to greet and introduce himself when meeting a stranger, etc. The words that the kid knows in his/her native language won’t confuse him in English.
  • Correct spelling. 7-years-old kids won’t be confused with English spelling. Moreover, at this age, most children still have good phonemic abilities so that they can quickly and correctly pronounce the sounds of foreign speech.
  • Children are easier to motivate. At this age, children acquire their first hobbies and interests, so you can offer your child an exciting “bonus” for which he will have to learn the language. Watch cartoons in the original, read interesting tales and stories, play online games in English!
  • No difficulties in overcoming the language barrier. Children are still not afraid to make mistakes; they are willing to have a dialogue with the teacher and don’t too much care about the accent. That is, at the age of 7, you will have time to prevent the emergence of the language barrier.

The disadvantages:

  • It is more difficult to remember new words. Compared to toddlers, children over 7 harder remember new words. On the other hand, at this age, the child learns everything consciously, that is, he understands the meaning of a particular word and how to use it.
  • Less time for language learning. Schoolchildren are always overloaded with large amounts of information, which leaves too little time for learning foreign languages.

If you are fluent in English and have a great desire to teach your child at home, you can try to deal with it without the help from the side. Although I can’t recommend this way of learning as the best for sure (because only an experienced teacher knows how and in what sequence to teach the material to make the lessons really effective), you still can succeed! With the parents, the kid will feel oneself more comfortable than with anyone else.

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Bio:
Lucy Adams is a blogger from buzz essay (https://buzzessay.com/). She’s an aspiring author who never refuses to cover intriguing and burning topics, regardless of their origin. Education, literature, marketing, business, psychology – whatever – if you have something exciting to suggest, Lucy will bring it to life!

New qualification launched to help address shortage of skilled Linguists in the public sector

16 February, 2017

New qualification launched to help address shortage of skilled Linguists in the public sector

The International School of Linguists (ISL) has launched a new qualification that will help to address the national shortage of skilled interpreters and translators servicing the public sector. Recognised by the National Register of Public Service Interpreters (NRPSI) as meeting its registration criteria, the new ISL Diploma in Community Interpreting is expected to help 1,000 linguists to qualify over time.

The Ministry of Justice was the first to recognise the qualification, allowing interpreters to provide language support in courtrooms. The ISL Diploma in Community Interpreting is also recognised by all language service providers nationally.

Those who complete the qualification successfully can apply to register with NRPSI, and will be able to work with the various public services across the UK, including the National Probation Service, NHS, police, prisons and the Home Office.

The course can be started at any time and is completed online or in the classroom. It features a blend of practical and written assessments, one-to-one support with extra tutors, and can be conducted at a linguist’s own pace. Some linguists can qualify in as little as six months.

NRPSI Executive Director Stephen Bishop says: “We’ve been extremely rigorous in ensuring the ISL qualification, which has a number of innovative features, meets our standards.

“We currently have around 1,900 linguists on our Register. It is not enough. With the ever-increasing demand for qualified, accountable linguists, we need more interpreters to qualify and meet NRPSI’s registration criteria. We need all interpreters working with the public services to be appropriately skilled if we are to protect the public and ensure the smooth-running of those services. Qualifications like ISL’s new Diploma in Community Interpreting will help to achieve this.”

Robert Mynett, General Manager of ISL, says: “The public finds it difficult to understand how there could be such a shortage of interpreters in languages such as Polish, Romanian and Urdu. But until now, the only way to qualify for high level interpreting cases was through a one-off annual test and while around 800 linguists take that test each year, only a small percentage passes the test.”

Compare this to ISL’s new Diploma in Community Interpreting, which Mynett says is already “seeing a 90% pass rate. This is because the process is testing actual skills rather than the stress of exam rooms.”

Through ISL, interpreters can study online or in the classroom and specialise in specific services.  A lot of the focus is on the law and criminal and police terminology. It is a rigorous and in-depth programme that not only delivers a qualification, but also ensures that linguists are fully prepared for all scenarios.

For more information on the standards for high level interpreting or the approval for the qualification, visit www.islinguists.com.

Ends

For further information or interview opportunities, please contact Robert Mynett, General Manager, on +44 (0)113 210 7457 or email Robert.Mynett@islinguists.com

Notes to Editors

The International School of Linguists is a learning and development partner to Europe’s largest language services provider, thebigword, and provides a range of innovative and bespoke programmes to help improve access to training and qualifications while improving the standard of language education and support.

It is headquartered in Leeds, West Yorkshire, but provides language programmes online and in locations around the UK and the rest of the world.

It delivers a range of qualifications for linguists and also develops assessment programmes and training schemes for individual customers to ensure their language skills are of the highest standard.

For more information about the International School for Linguists, please visit http://www.islinguists.com/

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Robert Mynett, General Manager

Securing Work for Court Interpreting – Made Simple

Among the most exclusive and sought after work for interpreters are assignments for the courts and police. This work is varied, challenging, interesting and gives you a chance to make a huge difference to the lives of people in your community – making sure the British justice system is working.  

But how do you become eligible for this rewarding work? Tess Wilkinson of ISL explains…

Most of you will be aware that the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has signed a new contract with thebigword to provide Face to Face, telephone and video interpreting services.

The MoJ has segmented the Interpreting assignments into 3 levels; Standard, Complex and Complex Written. These levels determine the complexity of work, Standard being straightforward assignments and Complex Written being the most complicated.

This means to secure assignments in sectors such as the Court and Police, you will need to have relevant experience and qualifications, and be entered on the Ministry of Justice Register.

Eligible Qualifications

There are a number of qualifications that make you eligible to work with the MoJ, including specific interpreting qualifications; Level 1-4 Certificates in Community Interpreting, the Diploma in Public Service Interpreting (DPSI) and the Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI).To make things a little simpler, the table below explains what ISL qualifications are eligible for which level of interpreting assignment.

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Ministry of Justice Register

To work on assignments with the MoJ, you need to be on the register. To join, you need a relevant qualification, as above, and you will also need to register via thebigword.

To register with thebigword as an Interpreter you need to email your CV to join@thebigword.com. If you don’t have an Interpreting CV or want professional help with improving your existing CV to make sure it stands out, browse our Interpreting CV Services here.

When you have completed thebigword on-boarding process, including completing some basic e-learning modules, you will be added to their register of interpreters and also to the MoJ register of Interpreters. At this point you are eligible to start receiving assignments.

Keep a look out for thebigword jobs here.

We hope that you find this post useful and if you wish to discuss your options further, please email the team at: info@islinguists.com.

If you are looking to become an Interpreter or to further your Interpreting skills and abilities to increase your earning potential, you can browse our Interpreting qualifications here.

 

 

New Year New Career

Have you made any New Year’s resolutions? Did you set any goals for 2017? What are your career prospects for the year ahead?

Develop your Interpreting career today with our accredited Community Interpreting qualifications. Whatever your circumstances, ISL can cater to your needs; whether you are new to the industry with minimal experience or an experienced interpreter wanting to develop your existing skills to work for the higher paid, more demanding sectors including Courts.

ISL interpreter qualifications are recognised across the industry by Language Service Providers, the MoJ and eligible for registration with the NRPSI at ‘Full’ status.

Have a look at our full list of Community Interpreting qualifications here.

To help you get the New Year of to a winning start, we are offering you 10% off your chosen ISL Community Interpreting qualification. To qualify for the discount, simply present the discount code ‘ny17Q10’ to the ISL team during your telephone discussion.

Look out for next week’s email with details on more fantastic products and New Year’s discounts.    

06/01/2017

 

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Already the memories of New Year’s Eve are starting to fade and we are well into 2017, however, there is still plenty of time to get started on your resolutions. If you wanted to earn more or diversify your career for 2017 then we have the perfect solutions for you.

Increase your earning potential and specialist skills and knowledge with one of our distance learning courses or classroom workshops. At ISL, alongside our accredited Interpreting qualifications we offer standalone courses including Interpreting for the NHS and Immigration services. We also offer a range of Interpreting classroom workshops.

For information on our standalone specialism courses, click here.

For a full listing of our classroom workshops, click here.

In light of the New Year, we are offering £10 off your chosen Distance Learning specialism course or workshop with the code 'ny17w10'. Enter at checkout to claim your discount. Look out for next week’s email with details on more fantastic products and New Year’s discounts.   

12/01/2017

 

Together, we can help you make a fresh start in a new, satisfying career or get new and interesting work by standing out from the crowd. Although by now some New Year’s Resolutions may have fallen by the wayside, it is still the ideal time to get advice on ways that you can revitalise and freshen up our career, or even get advice on how to start a new one.

Gain specialised and personal advice from our team of highly experienced and qualified interpreting mentors.

Our Specialist Mentoring Sessions are booked by the hour and can cover subjects such as:

• Where can I find work?
• How do I get into business interpreting?
• Where can I find interpreting experience?
• How do I progress my career?
• Where can I find CPD opportunities?

However, this session is completely yours to utilise so you may wish to get your own agenda together. For more information on our mentoring sessions, click here.

In light of the New Year, we are offering £10 off your first hour’s mentoring session with the code 'ny17m10'. Enter at checkout to claim your discount. Look out for next week’s email with details on more fantastic products and New Year’s discounts  

19/01/2017

 

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As we approach the end of January, I hope that you are still staying true to your New Year Resolutions. In the meantime, how would you feel about helping other people to achieve their goals while receive more satisfaction and rewards from your own career by becoming an Assessor?

Becoming an assessor provides unique and rewarding opportunities to enhance your career, expand your skills and unlock your earning potential. At ISL we offer two flexible and affordable Assessing qualifications to help you achieve this; Level 3 Award in Understanding Principles & Practices of Assessment and Level 3 Award in Assessing Competence in the Work Environment.

For more information on our assessing qualifications, click here.

In light of the New Year, we are offering £10 off your chosen assessing qualification with the code ny17a10. Please present the discount code to a member of staff when payment is being discussed

26/01/2017