court room, council chambers

LEEDS BASED COMPANY BREAKS UP CONTROL OF THE LINGUIST QUALIFICATION MARKET

The International School of Linguists (ISL) is widening access to the Diploma in Public Service Interpreting (DPSI), making it affordable for the first time and increasing the frequency of examinations from once or twice per year to every month. ISL’s aim is to increase the number and quality of linguists who are available to deliver services to British hospitals, courts and other vital public services.

ISL, the UK’s leading provider of interpreter qualifications, has teamed up with Training Qualifications UK, an awarding organisation recognised by the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation, to deliver the highly regarded qualification. TQUK award over 310 qualifications across 8 sectors and provide more interpreting qualifications than any other Awarding Organisation.

Until recently, the DPSI qualification was offered by a sole provider and in the opinion of many of our interpreters the route to qualification was restrictive in terms of languages, locations, timetables and cost.

The ISL qualification includes all of the same standards as our competitor, however, ISL is making it more widely available. From today, exam dates will be available every month of the year, and available from anywhere in the UK, in over 200 languages. We have also ensured that the qualification is more affordable. In addition, the ISL qualification is the only DPSI to offer all 5 units at level 6, making it the highest standard DPSI available.

Independence and fairness are at the heart of everything ISL does, that’s why we work with an Ofqual-regulated TQUK. Working with an independently owned, awarding organisation means that the quality of our qualification is guaranteed.

ISL General Manager, Robert Mynett, said: “The DPSI is a well-regarded qualification and has been producing the highest quality interpreters for many years. Following feedback from our interpreters, we are delighted that we can now improve accessibility, frequency, and affordability for interpreters across the UK.

Andrew Walker Managing Director at TQUK said: “We are delighted to have been approached by ISL and others within the interpreting sector to develop this new, exciting alternative to the established DPSI qualification.

Speaking to expert practitioners and training delivery staff during the development process, it quickly became apparent that the sector was crying out for a more flexible approach to assessment which removed barriers to learning and achievement, allowing more people to undertake this valuable qualification.  We have applied tried and tested vocational assessment methodologies to this qualification and are proud to be able to use our expertise to meet a need in the marketplace as identified by our subject experts and existing centres.

This qualification is rigorous, robust and reliable. We are confident that upon achievement learners will find themselves in possession of the highly specialist skills required and desired by the legal profession. We look forward to awarding our first certificates soon.

ISL was established in 2010 as a provider of training and testing that specialises in the language services industry. Over the last seven years we have grown to become the UK’s leading provider of interpreter qualifications and delivers quality provision to hundreds of students.

Do you have questions regarding our DPSI? Ring the team on 0800 757 3475 or email us on info@islinguists.com.

Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting – what options should I pick?

This is one of the most common questions we get asked here at ISL and there is no right or wrong answer. You can pick whatever options you please. However, for those students wanting to undertake the more higher paid, demanding and complex assignments such as the Police and Courts, there are certain options that we would recommend to increase your opportunities.

Our Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI) is a vocational qualification which means you are assessed continuously throughout your studies via written and practical assessments. Your course and assessments are an all-in-one approach rather than a one off pass or fail exam; as long as you complete all the work involved to the specified criteria, you get your certificate, period.

Within the DCI, you have to complete six mandatory modules, including Consecutive Interpreting and Simultaneous Interpreting. You then have the opportunity to select up to four specialist units ranging from Financial and Business Interpreting to Court and Police Interpreting. Our students get the chance to mix and match their qualification to their specific needs and wants. For example, if you want to be an Interpreter in the Mental Health settings but also want to explore Conference Interpreting, you can pick the optional units that support these goals.

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We often get questions from our students asking what optional units they should pick if they want to get the most out of their Interpreting career. The answer to this would be the Law options. This consists of:

  • Interpreting in Police Settings
  • Interpreting in Court Settings
  • Interpreting in the Prison/Probation Service
  • Supporting Interpreting through Draft Written Translations From and Into English

Completing these modules will allow you to work on the MoJ register at the highest level, become a member on the NRPSI register and work on all available Interpreting assignments within the UK. If you want to work on NHS, Mental Health Interpreting or any other assignments, these optional modules will allow you to do so, however, if you do not study the modules above(say you took health interpreting instead of police) you WILL NOT be able to work within law settings. Worth thinking about.

For these reasons, when students ask us which optional units are the best ones to pick we usually advise students to undertake the Law options, even if they plan on doing other Interpreting work, so they can fulfil their potential within their Interpreting career.

If you would like to view our Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI), please click here.

If you have any questions or wish to speak to the team please contact us on info@islinguists.com or 08007573475.

This blog is brought to you by Tess Wilkinson, Learning and Development Specialist at ISL.

 

 

Partnership Promises New Standards for Interpreters

A new partnership is promising to raise standards for interpreters used by companies and public sector organisations across the globe.

The International School of Linguists (ISL), based in Leeds, has announced a formal partnership with the Association of Certified Interpreters (ACCI), a global organisation providing skilled interpreters.

The partnership aims to improve the quality and skill levels for interpreters using ISL’s recognised course base for all ACCI members. Both organisations hope that this will give a better service to users of interpreting services such as the UK National Health System (NHS), the police and large financial firms who work across borders, but that it should also lead to better pay and conditions for interpreters who sign up.

lSL students will receive a reduced membership fee with ACCI in their first year. In exchange, ISL will provided quality CPD training workshops to ACCI members at a reduced rate.

 

Speaking about the new partnership, ISL Chief Executive Ilan Gould said: “ACCI is a fantastic partner and we share a commitment not only to delivering the best for our industry but also for a strong, supportive union of interpreters who are often the unsung heroes; smoothing the way in global trade and assisting in the delivery of vital public services such as the NHS. Interpreters even help support troops and make combat zones safer for armed forces personnel and civilians.

“A commitment to further professional development across the industry is essential to deliver for future needs; equipping interpreters themselves with a wider array of knowledge so they can focus their talents in an increasingly complex market and meeting the needs of highly specialist organisations and industries. We want to make sure we’re positioned with the right skills for the future and together, ISL and ACCI are meeting those challenges.”

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Pawel Janicki, a founder and the CEO of the ACCI said:

"I trust ISL will provide opportunities for CPD for our members and we have made Continuing Professional Development a requirement for all certified interpreters. Language interpreting is a profession which requires robust qualifications and commitment to professional standards and CPD. The ACCI’s vision is to unite language interpreters. By delivering our outcomes on behalf of our members we aim to lead the profession in high standards, quality and innovation. Our mission is to make the ACCI essential for professional interpreters, businesses and organisations and to be at the heart of leading the change in the profession."

"Language interpreters help to deliver frontline public services and they need the support and appropriate level of remuneration to guarantee public safety. Interpreters bridge the cultural and language gap and help with building community cohesion for harmonious communication between service users and limited English speakers."

"The ACCI and ISL partnership is the correct step towards this and we are looking to make more quality partnerships and to involve all stakeholders in the future to help achieve these goals."

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For further information or interview opportunities, please contact Robert Mynett, General Manager at ISL, on +44 (0)113 210 7457 or email robert.mynett@islinguists.com.

For more information about the International School for Linguists, please visit: www.islinguists.com

To learn more about the ACCI, visit: www.acciglobal.org

 

 

What Prevents Adults from Learning English?

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Is it possible to learn English in adulthood? What myths prevent us from learning foreign languages and how to achieve quick results? The answers are below!

The older you are, the more tools you can apply to achieve your goals. However, the greatest reason for unwillingness to learn English in adulthood is the next three mis-beliefs discovered by Lucy Adams, one of the British essay writers:

#1 Learning in Adulthood is Much More Complicated

 Children surpass adults only in two aspects:

  1. The ability to acquire the right accent. However, adults are quite capable of achieving the fluency of the native speaker. But even if an adult is more likely to speak with an accent, do not get too upset as it doesn’t prevent other people from understanding you.
  2. Children are free from defeatist thoughts. In other words, they treat learning as a natural process and quickly absorb new

Despite the two above disadvantages, adults can achieve better results through consciousness learning and focus on the process.

#2 Adults Should Learn Foreign Languages in the Same Way as Children Do

The child's brain is different so that one should not expect that children and adults will share the same teaching methods. It is not true. Alas, adults sometimes try to learn the language, abandoning all the strategies and experiences that have helped them to succeed. They are trying to master a foreign language naturally, just as they have mastered their native language. It's impossible. Such attempts inevitably lead to disappointment. The point is to rely on the accumulated cognitive experience and not to try to imitate the children.

 

#3 When Learning a Foreign Language, One Shouldn’t Use the Native Language

Some adult students believe that they should never translate from their native language to a foreign language. However, it deprives them of a free command of their native language. Although not all English phrases can be directly translated, there are many aspects that one can successfully borrow from any language!

For example, an adult native English speaker studying Portuguese would hardly notice that the Portuguese word "insidioso," which describes something gradually harming, resembles the English word "insidious." It's pointless to pretend that the knowledge of Portuguese is useless in this case.

Although sometimes the meaning does not match, it is very useful to look for common concepts, categories, and templates, and this is a great advantage of adult learners over children.

Unfortunately, any of these myths can prevent any adult – even with the highest motivation – from mastering English. A lot of research has been devoted to these incorrect statements, and the results in the field of cognitive science will be useful to all adults studying a foreign language, not just English!

Does it Really Take Twenty-One Days to Form a New Habit?

In 1960, the plastic surgeon Maxwell Moltz published a book called Psycho-Cybernetics: A New Way to Get More Living Out of Life. In it, he stated that a number of phenomena require twenty-one days to change (for example, "people must live in a new place for about three weeks to feel at home"). It is unclear how he received this magic number, but the subsequent studies have shown that the formation of a new habit does not take some fixed period. So focus on the quality rather than on the number of lessons!

Try to make English a significant part of your life. Some textbooks include stickers with words that can be glued to different objects. For example, if you learn Spanish, you can paste a sticker with the word "la cuchara" (a spoon) to the drawer of the kitchen table so that each time when you take a spoon, you will see the word associated with it.

Does the Delay Equal to a Failure?

Despite the best intentions, life always makes adjustments to our plans. You may find that you postponed foreign language classes for several days or even weeks. You may be upset, but that does not mean you should give up!
The formation of new habits is sometimes studied in the context of quitting smoking. The best strategy to predict whether a person will eventually quit smoking is to count the number of times he or she has been able to give up the habit for at least a few days or weeks.

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If you find yourself return to the old habit, do not think that you will not be able to master it. Do not forget that it's easier to learn familiar words than from scratch! Delays don’t lead to a failure until you try!

 

Language Aspects

Although teachers usually try to correct all mistakes, they still get used to your speech style. The teacher knows your accent, vocabulary, as well as the most commonly used grammatical constructions and favourite topics for discussion. That’s why the teacher understands you much better than an unfamiliar native speaker. This phenomenon is called "language proficiency within the Institute." But why is there such a big difference between the use of language in the classroom and the real world? The answer can be found in a phenomenon called "a common platform."

The common platform is typical not only for studying foreign languages. In any conversation, the interlocutors take into account personal and situational factors that they will or will not have in common. In other words, when you are talking to someone, you always take into account things which, according to your opinion, the interlocutor knows and doesn’t know. And now think about how much more difficult is to control a platform with someone belonging to a different culture!

One way to increase the chances that you will be understood outside the class is to think about what you can have in common with the interlocutor. For example, you can start with greetings and courtesies to help the interlocutor get accustomed to your accent.

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Create Memories

The size of our memory is determined by many factors, such as the level of intelligence (people with higher IQ show higher results in the tasks of memorising figures) and mood (people in chronic depression show lower results).

Another important factor is the age. The memory size grows in childhood and ceases to do it closer to 20. However, this s not such a big problem as it may seem at first glance. Adults have much more knowledge of the world than children so that they can apply the division into fragments much more effectively. Age can badly affect the number of memorised figures, but knowledge and experience help to compensate for memory impairment, giving meaning to these figures.

How can it be applied to learning? After listening, students are often asked to repeat it word-by-word. This is a tough task even for children, and with age, it becomes even more difficult. Even when people are asked to do this in their native language, they often fail. Native speakers paraphrase what they hear, preserving the meaning of the phrase, even if they do not use the same words. When foreign language learners try to repeat long passages word-by-word, they rather test their memory than develop their language skills. Adults learn better not by memorising by heart but integrating new concepts and material into the already existing cognitive structures!

Instead of the Conclusion

Remember the basic principle: positive information is processed more efficiently and is remembered better and longer than negative. The superiority of positive information over the negative was demonstrated in numerous studies, including those dealt with the memorisation of words, grammatical constructions, as well as the content of dialogues and texts.
Of course, it’s impossible to use only positively coloured words and sentences, but you can at least approach the process positively. Consider the next two sentences: a) "President is a woman;" b) "President is not a man." The first one will go easier because positive linguistic characteristics are easier to process. The same applies to listeners who will faster understand what you say.

I wish you best of luck in learning English!

 

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Bio
Lucy Adams is an aspiring businesswoman and blogger. Most of all, she’s interested in covering the most intriguing topics of yours, whether they are about business, writing or literature. Share your best ideas with the blogger and get a high-quality guest blog in a week or so!
 

What Do Students Really Think Of ISL?

 

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At ISL, we are really keen on receiving feedback from our customers and students as this allows us to continually grow and develop as a business and improve the services we offer.

 We are delighted to announce that our first Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting student, Elona, has had all of her work signed off and is awaiting her certificates. This is a great milestone for ISL and in light of this amazing success, we are offering you 10% off our Level 6 qualification with this code: feedback10. Please present the code to a member of the ISL team in your telephone discussion.

See what Elona had to say about her studies below:

1) Have you enjoyed the qualification?
Yes, I have enjoyed my qualification. It has been something different studying online.

2) What has been your experience vs. your initial perception of the qualification?
My initial perception of the qualification was that it will be straight forward and easy but I was wrong. The course needs lots of dedication and hard work.

3) Did you progress as well as you hoped prior to making a start?
I think I have done well but I have to mention a few people to thank them for their support: Pam, Robert Teresa and Ajub have been really helpful and professional.

4) What were the biggest challenges you faced?
Knowing my target language in-depth IE: terminology. I never knew how much I can learn.

5) What would you change about your experience?
Overall, It has been great. There were some delays getting everything signed off but I still enjoyed the course. Loved the activities.

6) What did you enjoy most about the qualification?
The online activities and the CPD days where I got to meet other students.

7) Is there anything that you would like to see more or less of in the qualification?
I personally think the assessor plays a key role in the course so having the right assessors working for ISL is key to success. Every student has a different learning style.

8) How has completing this qualification impacted on your life?
It will open more doors for my future.

9) What advice would you give to anyone thinking of taking on this qualification?
Make sure you dedicate enough time for the course.

10) What is next for you?
This certificate will help me a lot to succeed further into the interpreting career, so who knows, I just want to keep climbing stairs of success.

Receive £100 off your ISL Interpreting Qualification

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Have your learning experiences published and win

We are running a competition to find out more about your learning experiences with ISL. Since you studied and achieved an Interpreting qualification with us, we would love to know about your experiences.
 
Have you got any particular experiences you would like to share? What challenges did you face and how did you overcome them? How did you make the style of learning work for you? What opportunities have you managed to find since you graduated?
 
Send your blog to the ISL team and the best student story will be featured on our next newsletter.
Oh and did we also mention that the winning story will receive £100 off their next qualification with ISL?
We will credit your blog and ensure your name is featured within the entry.
We look forward to reading all of your stories!

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T&C's apply: 1 entry per person. Competition ends 14/04/17. Entries should be written on a word document, with your full name, email address and the level of qualification you are currently studying or have studied with ISL. Entries will not be accepted in any other format. By sending ISL your stories, you are agreeing to have them used for marketing and testimonial purposes. The ISL judges decision is final and no correspondence will be entered in to. Winners will be contacted personally. The prize(s) must be taken as stated and cannot be deferred. There will be no cash alternatives. ISL do not accept any responsibility for late or lost entries due to the Internet or postal service. Proof of sending is not proof of receipt. Only one entry will be accepted per person. The deadline for receiving entries for the competition is final. No entries received after the given date will be considered. Prizes unclaimed after 28 days will be deemed to have been forfeited and ISL reserves the right to either offer the prize to the entrant whose name is next drawn at random, or to re-offer the prize in any future competition.

Receive £50 off your ISL Interpreting Qualification

we need you v2

Have your learning experiences published

We are running a competition to find out more about your learning experiences with ISL. If you are currently studying an Interpreting qualification with us, we would love to know about your experiences. Have you got any particular experiences you would like to share? What challenges are you facing and how do you overcome them? How have you made the style of learning work for you? What opportunities have you managed to find since you started?

Send your blog to the ISL team and the best student story will be featured on our next newsletter.

Oh and did we also mention that the winning story will receive £50 off their current qualification with ISL?

We will credit your blog and ensure your name is featured within the entry.

We look forward to reading all of your stories!

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

T&C's apply: 1 entry per person. Competition ends 14/04/17. Entries should be written on a word document, with your full name, email address and the level of qualification you are currently studying or have studied with ISL. Entries will not be accepted in any other format. By sending ISL your stories, you are agreeing to have them used for marketing and testimonial purposes. The ISL judges decision is final and no correspondence will be entered in to. Winners will be contacted personally. The prize(s) must be taken as stated and cannot be deferred. There will be no cash alternatives. ISL do not accept any responsibility for late or lost entries due to the Internet or postal service. Proof of sending is not proof of receipt. Only one entry will be accepted per person. The deadline for receiving entries for the competition is final. No entries received after the given date will be considered. Prizes unclaimed after 28 days will be deemed to have been forfeited and ISL reserves the right to either offer the prize to the entrant whose name is next drawn at random, or to re-offer the prize in any future competition.

Choosing The Right Path For You: Online or Classroom Learning?

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At ISL we have found that this is a very common question. Which is the best way to study: online (also known as distance learning) or classroom? It’s not easy selecting the ideal option as there are many factors to consider; flexibility, travel arrangements, cost etc. Having personal experience studying both online and classroom and working so closely with our Interpreting Qualifications and our students, I can offer some advice for practising Interpreters struggling to choose the right study option for them.

The first factor to consider is Time. Do you have the time to fit a classroom qualification into your schedule? Working full time myself, I know and understand the struggles of having the time to fit everyday life into the short few hours you get to yourself after the working day is done. Some of you may have families to tend which makes timing even trickier. Some of you may be full time Interpreters, meaning your schedule is busy and unpredictable. Keep in mind that if you choose a classroom qualification, you will need to commit to attending on a regular basis, at a certain time each week and it’s not just the time spent at class that you have to plan for, you also need to consider your travel time and time to complete homework assignments. If the answer to my first question is ‘No’, then I would strongly advise looking into an online qualification. Our online Interpreter qualifications are very flexible and accessible. You have the freedom to log in and out of your studies whenever and wherever you like; from your smartphone or your laptop.it everyday life into the short few hours you get to yourself after the working day is done. Some of you may have families to tend which makes timing even trickier. Some of you may be full time Interpreters, meaning your schedule is busy and unpredictable. Keep in mind that if you choose a classroom qualification, you will need to commit to attending on a regular basis, at a certain time each week and it’s not just the time spent at class that you have to plan for, you also need to consider your travel time and time to complete homework assignments. If the answer to my first question is ‘No’, then I would strongly advise looking into an online qualification. Our online Interpreter qualifications are very flexible and accessible. You have the freedom to log in and out of your studies whenever and wherever you like; from your smartphone or your laptop.

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Another factor to consider is your learning preference. How do you like to learn? Are you a visual learner? Do you learn better by being surrounded with peers? Or do you like to get stuck in and learn as you go? All of our online Interpreter qualifications feature an element of all 3 learning styles. We believe that every individual learns and processes information in a different way, so we always try to cater for this. If you find that your motivation to study is low, a classroom learning option might be best here. In a classroom, a teacher or tutor will be present as well as a classroom full of other students, and there is a set schedule for attending these classroom sessions and for completing work. This is a great motivator as you have to attend these sessions, and if you don’t, you will not gain the full qualification. For distance learning, one way around this is to agree deadlines with your assessor and make sure you stick to them.

Do you have the facilities to travel to a physical location? This is an important question to ask, as this alone can be a deciding factor for if a classroom or online qualification is the best option for you. If the classroom location of the qualification is a fair distance from your home, this is off putting and demotivating for many reasons. It could be costly, it could be time consuming, and you may not drive and have to take public transport (which is unreliable at the best of times!). With a distance learning option, all of the time you put aside for your qualification can be spent studying so if travel is an issue, the online option is best for you.

The next factor I would consider is support. How do you like to be supported whilst studying? Do you like to be supported on a 1-2-1 basis, within a group of students or not at all? Many people assume an online qualification comes with no support from a tutor or assessor and, in a lot of cases, this is true. However, at ISL, we provide our students with qualified and experienced assessors. Our assessors provide 1-2-1 support via Skype and email. If you prefer not to have any support and be left to your own devices, this is also an option. You can go through the content of the course by yourself and then discuss your progress with your assessor at the end of each module. If you prefer to work in groups or with a class of students and a teacher, then the classroom learning option should be considered here but remember, you will still be required to work on your own to complete the majority of your assignments.

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Finally, a key consideration for the majority of people is cost. Have you considered the full cost of the qualification such as price of attending, travel costs, childcare costs etc.? For a classroom qualification, you have to consider every single cost you may incur. You may have to take time off work to attend the classroom, which may mean that you do not get paid, if you have children you may need to arrange childcare which is costly. You need to consider the price of transport getting to and from the classroom eg: petrol costs or bus/train fare and finally, you need to look at the overall enrolment cost. The total cost for a classroom qualification is more than likely higher than that of a distance learning qualification because you do not have to consider add on costs for a distance learning qualification. At ISL, the cost of our qualifications cover all learning material, assessment fees and the support from your assessor and language specialist. There is no travel or childcare costs as you can study from the comfort of your own home.

 

Online, or distance learning is becoming increasingly popular and will eventually be the leading and preferred learning method. According to research conducted by the U.S. Department of Education, students undertaking online qualifications or training courses actually perform better than those attending a classroom course.

Why not browse our online interpreting qualifications?

We hope this information will help you to choose your ideal learning method. Do you have a question? Contact us and we would be more than happy to help!

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This blog is brought to you by Tess Wilkinson from the International School of Linguists.

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How to Make Your Child an English-Speaker from Birth, Being a Non-Native Citizen

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Undoubtedly, parents want the best for their children. And that’s why almost every up-to-date adult wants his/her kid to know English, a global language that opens countless opportunities regardless of your origin and place of residence.

Some parents are really obsessed with the idea to start teaching their kids as early as possible. But is it that good to make your kid a bilingual from the very birth? Won’t your baby face troubles in this case?

In this article, I shed light on the problem of learning English depending on the age. Let’s face it: there’s no exact answer to the question of when to start teaching English. However, I’ll consider two options along with their pros and cons. And since you know your child well, I’m sure you’ll be able to decide which of these options suits you.

#1 As Early as Possible

Supporters of this theory say that children from birth to 5-6 years easily learn any language. As kids learn their native language naturally, they can also master any foreign one.

The advantages:

  • Unconscious learning. Kids learn English as a native language; that is, they just passively listen and then reproduce the words and phrases in their speech.
  • The kid is not afraid to speak. At an early age, a child s less afraid to fail than an adult so that he/she boldly uses the studied language. Kids don’t have to overcome the language barrier because they feel themselves free and do not have complexes.
  • Good memory. There is a theory that under-5 children’s language learning abilities are above average because they faster memorise words and phrases. They just repeat everything they hear!
  • Clear speech. It is believed that the child is easier to learn the correct speech because the imitative abilities are at an advanced level.

The disadvantages:

  • The need of immersion. A “natural” way of teaching is possible only if the child is among native speakers. That is, the kid must daily hear the English language from others. This is possible if he/she lives abroad, or at least one of the parents or a babysitter speaks English.
  • The risk of mechanical studying. At the early age, the kid’s native skills are poor so that he/she pronounces sentence automatically, no really understanding the connection between words. Rote memorisation is far from being the most effective method of language learning.
  • Lack of motivation. As the child learns while playing, you need to adjust the conditions accordingly. You’ll have to find a teacher who will be able to teach the child through play and instil him a love of language learning.

So, teaching the child from birth is the best choice if:

  • You are living or going to live in an English-speaking country.
  • At least one person in the family is a native speaker (or fluent in English).
  • You know how to teach in an unobtrusive and interesting manner or find a tutor who knows how to do it

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#2 At the Age of 7 or Later

Proponents of this view believe that foreign languages should be taught in conscious age, not to torment the kid with incomprehensible words. If the child is not in an English-speaking country and his/her parents do not speak English as often as the native language, there’s no point to start the teaching process earlier that at the age of 7.

 

The advantages:

  • Children get used to learning. At the age of 7, most kids are already gets used to the regime as they go to school. Children become more organised and able to learn, do homework, listen to teachers, etc.
  • Children are already fluent in their native language. School-age children have a wide vocabulary and a good command of their native languages. For example, the child understands that it is necessary to greet and introduce himself when meeting a stranger, etc. The words that the kid knows in his/her native language won’t confuse him in English.
  • Correct spelling. 7-years-old kids won’t be confused with English spelling. Moreover, at this age, most children still have good phonemic abilities so that they can quickly and correctly pronounce the sounds of foreign speech.
  • Children are easier to motivate. At this age, children acquire their first hobbies and interests, so you can offer your child an exciting “bonus” for which he will have to learn the language. Watch cartoons in the original, read interesting tales and stories, play online games in English!
  • No difficulties in overcoming the language barrier. Children are still not afraid to make mistakes; they are willing to have a dialogue with the teacher and don’t too much care about the accent. That is, at the age of 7, you will have time to prevent the emergence of the language barrier.

The disadvantages:

  • It is more difficult to remember new words. Compared to toddlers, children over 7 harder remember new words. On the other hand, at this age, the child learns everything consciously, that is, he understands the meaning of a particular word and how to use it.
  • Less time for language learning. Schoolchildren are always overloaded with large amounts of information, which leaves too little time for learning foreign languages.

If you are fluent in English and have a great desire to teach your child at home, you can try to deal with it without the help from the side. Although I can’t recommend this way of learning as the best for sure (because only an experienced teacher knows how and in what sequence to teach the material to make the lessons really effective), you still can succeed! With the parents, the kid will feel oneself more comfortable than with anyone else.

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Bio:
Lucy Adams is a blogger from buzz essay (https://buzzessay.com/). She’s an aspiring author who never refuses to cover intriguing and burning topics, regardless of their origin. Education, literature, marketing, business, psychology – whatever – if you have something exciting to suggest, Lucy will bring it to life!

New qualification launched to help address shortage of skilled Linguists in the public sector

16 February, 2017

New qualification launched to help address shortage of skilled Linguists in the public sector

The International School of Linguists (ISL) has launched a new qualification that will help to address the national shortage of skilled interpreters and translators servicing the public sector. Recognised by the National Register of Public Service Interpreters (NRPSI) as meeting its registration criteria, the new ISL Diploma in Community Interpreting is expected to help 1,000 linguists to qualify over time.

The Ministry of Justice was the first to recognise the qualification, allowing interpreters to provide language support in courtrooms. The ISL Diploma in Community Interpreting is also recognised by all language service providers nationally.

Those who complete the qualification successfully can apply to register with NRPSI, and will be able to work with the various public services across the UK, including the National Probation Service, NHS, police, prisons and the Home Office.

The course can be started at any time and is completed online or in the classroom. It features a blend of practical and written assessments, one-to-one support with extra tutors, and can be conducted at a linguist’s own pace. Some linguists can qualify in as little as six months.

NRPSI Executive Director Stephen Bishop says: “We’ve been extremely rigorous in ensuring the ISL qualification, which has a number of innovative features, meets our standards.

“We currently have around 1,900 linguists on our Register. It is not enough. With the ever-increasing demand for qualified, accountable linguists, we need more interpreters to qualify and meet NRPSI’s registration criteria. We need all interpreters working with the public services to be appropriately skilled if we are to protect the public and ensure the smooth-running of those services. Qualifications like ISL’s new Diploma in Community Interpreting will help to achieve this.”

Robert Mynett, General Manager of ISL, says: “The public finds it difficult to understand how there could be such a shortage of interpreters in languages such as Polish, Romanian and Urdu. But until now, the only way to qualify for high level interpreting cases was through a one-off annual test and while around 800 linguists take that test each year, only a small percentage passes the test.”

Compare this to ISL’s new Diploma in Community Interpreting, which Mynett says is already “seeing a 90% pass rate. This is because the process is testing actual skills rather than the stress of exam rooms.”

Through ISL, interpreters can study online or in the classroom and specialise in specific services.  A lot of the focus is on the law and criminal and police terminology. It is a rigorous and in-depth programme that not only delivers a qualification, but also ensures that linguists are fully prepared for all scenarios.

For more information on the standards for high level interpreting or the approval for the qualification, visit www.islinguists.com.

Ends

For further information or interview opportunities, please contact Robert Mynett, General Manager, on +44 (0)113 210 7457 or email Robert.Mynett@islinguists.com

Notes to Editors

The International School of Linguists is a learning and development partner to Europe’s largest language services provider, thebigword, and provides a range of innovative and bespoke programmes to help improve access to training and qualifications while improving the standard of language education and support.

It is headquartered in Leeds, West Yorkshire, but provides language programmes online and in locations around the UK and the rest of the world.

It delivers a range of qualifications for linguists and also develops assessment programmes and training schemes for individual customers to ensure their language skills are of the highest standard.

For more information about the International School for Linguists, please visit http://www.islinguists.com/

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Robert Mynett, General Manager

Securing Work for Court Interpreting – Made Simple

Among the most exclusive and sought after work for interpreters are assignments for the courts and police. This work is varied, challenging, interesting and gives you a chance to make a huge difference to the lives of people in your community – making sure the British justice system is working.  

But how do you become eligible for this rewarding work? Tess Wilkinson of ISL explains…

Most of you will be aware that the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has signed a new contract with thebigword to provide Face to Face, telephone and video interpreting services.

The MoJ has segmented the Interpreting assignments into 3 levels; Standard, Complex and Complex Written. These levels determine the complexity of work, Standard being straightforward assignments and Complex Written being the most complicated.

This means to secure assignments in sectors such as the Court and Police, you will need to have relevant experience and qualifications, and be entered on the Ministry of Justice Register.

Eligible Qualifications

There are a number of qualifications that make you eligible to work with the MoJ, including specific interpreting qualifications; Level 1-4 Certificates in Community Interpreting, the Diploma in Public Service Interpreting (DPSI) and the Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI).To make things a little simpler, the table below explains what ISL qualifications are eligible for which level of interpreting assignment.

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Ministry of Justice Register

To work on assignments with the MoJ, you need to be on the register. To join, you need a relevant qualification, as above, and you will also need to register via thebigword.

To register with thebigword as an Interpreter you need to email your CV to join@thebigword.com. If you don’t have an Interpreting CV or want professional help with improving your existing CV to make sure it stands out, browse our Interpreting CV Services here.

When you have completed thebigword on-boarding process, including completing some basic e-learning modules, you will be added to their register of interpreters and also to the MoJ register of Interpreters. At this point you are eligible to start receiving assignments.

Keep a look out for thebigword jobs here.

We hope that you find this post useful and if you wish to discuss your options further, please email the team at: info@islinguists.com.

If you are looking to become an Interpreter or to further your Interpreting skills and abilities to increase your earning potential, you can browse our Interpreting qualifications here.

 

 

New Year New Career

Have you made any New Year’s resolutions? Did you set any goals for 2017? What are your career prospects for the year ahead?

Develop your Interpreting career today with our accredited Community Interpreting qualifications. Whatever your circumstances, ISL can cater to your needs; whether you are new to the industry with minimal experience or an experienced interpreter wanting to develop your existing skills to work for the higher paid, more demanding sectors including Courts.

ISL interpreter qualifications are recognised across the industry by Language Service Providers, the MoJ and eligible for registration with the NRPSI at ‘Full’ status.

Have a look at our full list of Community Interpreting qualifications here.

To help you get the New Year of to a winning start, we are offering you 10% off your chosen ISL Community Interpreting qualification. To qualify for the discount, simply present the discount code ‘ny17Q10’ to the ISL team during your telephone discussion.

Look out for next week’s email with details on more fantastic products and New Year’s discounts.    

06/01/2017

 

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Already the memories of New Year’s Eve are starting to fade and we are well into 2017, however, there is still plenty of time to get started on your resolutions. If you wanted to earn more or diversify your career for 2017 then we have the perfect solutions for you.

Increase your earning potential and specialist skills and knowledge with one of our distance learning courses or classroom workshops. At ISL, alongside our accredited Interpreting qualifications we offer standalone courses including Interpreting for the NHS and Immigration services. We also offer a range of Interpreting classroom workshops.

For information on our standalone specialism courses, click here.

For a full listing of our classroom workshops, click here.

In light of the New Year, we are offering £10 off your chosen Distance Learning specialism course or workshop with the code 'ny17w10'. Enter at checkout to claim your discount. Look out for next week’s email with details on more fantastic products and New Year’s discounts.   

12/01/2017

 

Together, we can help you make a fresh start in a new, satisfying career or get new and interesting work by standing out from the crowd. Although by now some New Year’s Resolutions may have fallen by the wayside, it is still the ideal time to get advice on ways that you can revitalise and freshen up our career, or even get advice on how to start a new one.

Gain specialised and personal advice from our team of highly experienced and qualified interpreting mentors.

Our Specialist Mentoring Sessions are booked by the hour and can cover subjects such as:

• Where can I find work?
• How do I get into business interpreting?
• Where can I find interpreting experience?
• How do I progress my career?
• Where can I find CPD opportunities?

However, this session is completely yours to utilise so you may wish to get your own agenda together. For more information on our mentoring sessions, click here.

In light of the New Year, we are offering £10 off your first hour’s mentoring session with the code 'ny17m10'. Enter at checkout to claim your discount. Look out for next week’s email with details on more fantastic products and New Year’s discounts  

19/01/2017

 

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As we approach the end of January, I hope that you are still staying true to your New Year Resolutions. In the meantime, how would you feel about helping other people to achieve their goals while receive more satisfaction and rewards from your own career by becoming an Assessor?

Becoming an assessor provides unique and rewarding opportunities to enhance your career, expand your skills and unlock your earning potential. At ISL we offer two flexible and affordable Assessing qualifications to help you achieve this; Level 3 Award in Understanding Principles & Practices of Assessment and Level 3 Award in Assessing Competence in the Work Environment.

For more information on our assessing qualifications, click here.

In light of the New Year, we are offering £10 off your chosen assessing qualification with the code ny17a10. Please present the discount code to a member of staff when payment is being discussed

26/01/2017

Upcoming Opportunities for Assessors

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Becoming an assessor provides unique and rewarding opportunities to enhance your career, expand your skills and unlock your earning potential. Due to the Government’s recent Apprenticeship Reforms, there has never been a better time to qualify.

City & Guilds and many other organisations have been approved to deliver hundreds of thousands of assessments across a number of new Apprenticeships. This means they are now recruiting Independent ‘End Point’ Assessors. To help you start your career as an ‘Independent End Point Assessor’ and access these exciting opportunities, ISL currently offer two distance learning assessor qualifications:

Studying with ISL has the additional benefits:

• Flexible, home based studying
• Affordable courses to suit a range of budgets
• Self-led study that can be completed at your own pace
• Practical and theory modules teach you all you need to know to get started
• Guidance from your fully qualified assessor
• Reputable provider with a proven track record of helping individuals achieve qualifications

 

For general enquiries, please email the team on info@islinguists.com.

 

 

 

Spot the Santa Competition – Winner Announced!

ISL recently hosted a ‘Spot the Santa’ competition via our Facebook Page and the aim of the competition was to find Sneaky Santa who had hidden himself in the ISL headquarters. See below for a reminder of the competition:

“Can you find him?

While the ISL team were having their tea break, sneaky Santa snuck into the ISL office, put up some festive decorations and hid himself. He is now playing havoc with our learning systems and needs to be found quick, in time for December 24th! Can you spot him? It is quite difficult.

Comment on his location and you will be entered into a draw to win a place on either:

– An ISL classroom interpreter workshop OR
– An ISL online CPD course

The winner will be announced next Thursday 15th at 10:00.

Share and like.”

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In case you didn’t spot Santa, he is hiding between Pam’s computer monitor and her phone – you can just see his head sticking up. Our competition winner is Petra Pesa and she got in touch with us yesterday to claim her prize:

“Good morning (or Good Day), dear ISL!

I am so happy to be your winner of the Santa Competition!!! 😉 Actually, I still can not believe it…. It definitely made my day this morning, and Christmas just began for me!! 🙂 

Please advise the next steps…I will be awaiting further instructions from you.

Thank you so much!

Have a wonderful day. And say Hi to my Santa if he’s still around….. 🙂

Sincerely,

Best Regards,

Petra Pesa”

Well Petra, Santa certainly is still around – we found him thanks to you and all of our other entrants – but he is in a safe place where he can’t cause any trouble. He will soon be departing for the North Pole as apparently he has some deliveries to organise.

Petra is now deciding which prize she would like to claim and we look forward to enrolling her.

Thank you to everyone that took part. We would all like to take this opportunity to wish you a great festive season and we hope you have a prosperous new year.

 

Interpreting Job Vacancies

 

 

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thebigword are looking for bi-lingual/multilingual individuals to fulfil Face to Face and Telephone Interpreting assignments in all areas of the UK for a major new client in the justice/legal sector.

They need bi-lingual/multilingual individuals with experience of Interpreting in a justice/legal environment to fulfil an anticipated 140 000 bookings per year.

If you’re customer focused and dedicated to your work then they would love to hear from you!

thebigword are urgently looking for Vietnamese linguists across the whole of England and Wales with a wide variety of face-to-face bookings available.

In order to apply for these assignments you will;

  • be bi-lingual/multilingual
  • have English proficiency or be willing to be assessed for this
  • have a recognised Interpreting qualification
  • have the right to work in the UK
  • hold or be willing to obtain an enhanced DBS (Disclosure and Barring Service)

If you meet the above criteria and would like to offer your services to thebigword please send your details to callum.williamson@thebigword.com or call 0113 210 7731.

 

 

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Our Language Service Provider partner, thebigword, have currently got opportunities for Acholi interpreters. If you can speak Acholi or know someone who does, please get in touch with gemma.lynch@thebigword.com

09/01/2017

thebigword are currently looking to recruit a number of Vietnamese Interpreters for an Urgent booking. If you are interested in this opportunity, please email: linguist@thebigword.com.

16/12/2016

thebigword are also looking for bi-lingual/multilingual individuals to fulfil Face to Face and Telephone Interpreting assignments in all areas of the UK for a major new client in the justice/legal sector.

  • Language: Danish
  • Area: Warwickshire

We need bi-lingual/multilingual individuals with experience of Interpreting in a justice/legal environment to fulfil an anticipated 140 000 bookings per year.

If you’re customer focused and dedicated to your work then we would love to hear from you!

In order to apply for these assignments you will;

  • be bi-lingual/multilingual
  • have English proficiency or be willing to be assessed for this
  • have a recognised Interpreting qualification
  • have the right to work in the UK
  • hold or be willing to obtain an enhanced DBS (Disclosure and Barring Service)

If you meet the above criteria and would like to offer your services to thebigword please send your details to dpsilinguist@thebigword.com or call 0800 757 3100.

Do you need level 6 qualification?

Visit our training partner, the International School of Linguists. Through them you can take the Level 6 Diploma in Public Service Interpreting as distance learning. Qualification will give you access to this kind of specialist client work.

16/12/2016

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Pearl Linguistics is a national Interpreting and Translation Company. Currently, we are looking for experienced Community Interpreters in Bristol. Due to increased demand, we are currently hiring interpreters in Kurdish, Somali, Cantonese or Mandarin.

Interpreters will be required to:

- Excel in dealing with sensitive situations
- Have ongoing access to internet and e-mail
- Behave in a professional manner
- He eligible to work in the UK
- Provide a current valid DBS check , if possible, or undergo one
- Provide references

If you are keen to work with one of the largest providers of Interpreting Services in the UK with long-term and reputable contracts, you must contact us today! To start your online application:

www.interpreterjobs.co.uk

Need assistance? Call: 020 7017 3233 or Email: recruitment@pearllinguistics.com.

14/12/2016

ISL December Newsletter

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ISL December Newsletter 2016 – 09/12/16

Well, what a year it has been for ISL! From creating brand new, industry changing qualifications to being the finalists in the E-Learning and Training Journal awards, read our December newsletter to see all our achievements this year.

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Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI)

At the start of this year, ISL released its Level 6 Certificate in Community Interpreting (DCI) qualification. The DCI qualification is an equivalent of the Diploma in Public Service Interpreting (DPSI) and allows linguists, upon successful completion, to do the same level of work the DPSI allows. Students can study more than one specialism within the same course, something which the DPSI doesn’t offer. Nearly a year on and our DCI qualification has had a great success with over 100 students enrolled. Here are just some of the benefits of undertaking our DCI:

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In this issue, we are offering a terrific discount on the DCI. Scroll down to find out more.

To register your place on our DCI qualification, click here.

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Ministry of Justice (MoJ) Recognition

You may or may not know that the MoJ have signed a new contract with our partner company, thebigword. In October, we were proud to announce that our Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI) was recognised by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) as one of the qualifications that will allow interpreters to work on all of their interpreting assignments. This means that not only could our students specialise in more then one sector and be fully qualified as an interpreter, their qualification would also be recognised by the MoJ allowing them to work on the highest paid and most demanding interpreting assignments.

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National Register of Public Service Interpreting (NRPSI) Recognition

After months of rigorous assessment to ensure the quality was high enough and the topics covered satisfy their high standards, the National Register of Public Service Interpreters (NRPSI) have recognised our Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI) qualification!

The NRPSI Qualifications Committee reviewed the DCI and has determined that applicants who pass the qualification, including the optional module ‘Supporting Interpreting Through Draft Written Translations From and Into English’ will meet the qualification registration requirements for ‘Full status’.

To our knowledge, this is the first time that any qualification other than the DPSI has achieved these requirements.

Read more here.

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Award Finalists

Earlier this year, ISL ‘s Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting qualifications was put forward for not 1 but 2 E-Learning awards! We were shortlisted as finalists for the Training Journal Awards 2016 in the category ‘Best Private/Commercial Programme’ and  Learning Technology 2016 Awards in the category ‘Best Online Distance Learning programme’. Our Level 3 qualification is aimed at interpreters who are new to the industry with little or no experience that wish to start work as a professional. This is amazing for ISL and great recognition for the courses and qualifications we are running.

For more information on our Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting, click here.

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Full Time Centre Manager

In September this year, we gained another full time employee to ISL, expanding our team even further. Pam Kaur previously worked for us on a freelance basis doing assessing work for our community interpreting qualifications. Going above and beyond her role as an assessor, we asked Pam to work as a part time, freelance IQA and Centre Manager. Recognising her talents and abilities even further, we asked Pam to become a full time Centre Manager. After signing her employment contract, we no longer have a part time Pam but a Permanent Pam. Check out her linked in page here.

Pam Kaur

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Classroom Qualifications and Course

ISL have expanded from a distance learning centre to a blended learning centre by offering a number of classroom courses and workshops. We offer our Level 3 and Level 6 interpreting qualifications by classroom learning as well as distance learning. We have also introduced some classroom workshops on various subjects such as CPD for Interpreters and Police Interpreting.

You can find a listing of our workshops here.

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In light of our growing success this year, ISL are pleased to bring you our biggest discount yet. We are offering you £150 off our DCI qualification. Use the code: 2k16150 when arranging payment with the team.

This offer expires 31.12.2016 (23:59)

To register your place on our DCI qualification, click here.

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Thank you all for your continued support and we look forward to seeing what 2017 holds for ISL.

Stay in touch. If you have any enquires suggestions or ideas, please email the team on info@islinguists.com.

Facebook. Twitter. LinkedIn.

ISL Level 6 DCI Recognised by the NRPSI

This morning, in the season of giving, ISL received an early present.

After months of rigorous assessment to ensure the quality was high enough and the topics covered satisfy their high standards, the National Register of Public Service Interpreters (NRPSI) have recognised our Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI) qualification!

The NRPSI Qualifications Committee reviewed the DCI and has determined that applicants who pass the qualification, including the optional module ‘Supporting Interpreting Through Draft Written Translations From and Into English’ will meet the qualification registration requirements for ‘Full status’.

To our knowledge, this is the first time that any qualification other than the DPSI has achieved these requirements.

Applicants for registration with NRPSI who have passed the DCI without taking the optional translation module would meet the registration requirements by also providing evidence of passing the two translation units from the DPSI, or any other translation qualification that meets the qualification requirements within the National Occupational Standards for Interpreting.

This is amazing news for linguists around the UK as this now means they have an alternative route to becoming a fully qualified linguist. Not only that, but our DCI qualification has many additional benefits in addition to opening up many work opportunities.

Thank you for your continued support and we look forward to what 2017 holds for ISL!

For any enquires, please contact us on info@islinguists.com.

How To Start Working As a Freelance Translator and Interpreter To Guarantee a Successful and Profitable Career – Part 4

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Value delivery: How a freelance translator and interpreter can make their clients happy.

Delivering a translation or interpreting services isn’t a big thing. Normally we just need wifi connection to send an email, or being at a conference in time to familiarise with the booth.

However, value delivery is more than that. We need to make sure that our services fulfil what we’ve promised in our offer. If they don’t, you’ll start getting negative feedback, and a unsatisfied client is the worst type of marketing.

 

 

 

So, how can we make a client satisfied?

  • Have a look at all the points that you promise to deliver (deadlines, the purpose of your services, your promise, quality, etc.), and make sure that your services match your clients’ expectations. If they don’t, step back and analyse what happened to improve your services for the next assignment.
  • Over deliver when possible. If your can deliver your translation a day before the deadline, your client is going to be even happier. And positive feedback and a good review will improve your reputation, which will make your clients trust you even more.
  • Ask for feedback. Positive feedback is great, but you need to know the honest opinion of your clients to get to know what you need to improve. Improving your services and offering exactly what your clients want is the key to develop your client portfolio.

 

Finance: Basic finance concepts that a translator and interpreter must master

Finance is the magic word. Every time I mention it to some of my clients, they seem to get scared or fall asleep. When we think about finance, all these complex formulas and abstract concepts always come to our minds. But finance doesn’t need to be boring. For me, finance is what makes me know how healthy my business is. And I think that every freelance translator and interpreter must know a few basic concepts to analyse the performance of their business at the end of the month/year.

  • Overhead: What fixed expenses do you have to cover every month? Your rent, bills or the council tax are fixed values that you know you have to pay each month. You should bear in mind all these expenses to analyse if your profits are covering all these expenses.
  • Revenue: This is all the money that you’re bringing in thanks to your business. If you’re offering more than one service, you’ll have to analyse what percentage of your revenue comes from each of your services to analyse which one is being more profitable.
  • Business expenses: This is the money that you need to spend to keep your business working (taxes, equipment, software, etc.) Do you need to pay for transport to attend a conference every week? Without the money for commuting to the conference, you won’t be able to offer your services.
  • Profit: This basically means that you’re bringing in more money than you spend on your business. If you’re spending more money in your marketing (website domain, ads, etc.) than the money that you’re earning, you’ll have financial problems in the long run (or not so in the long run).

A basic financial analyse for a freelance translator and interpreter would have to cover all these points. You can calculate your overhead and this amount will have to be present in every single month that you’re running your business. Then you’ll have to keep records of your expenses and revenue to calculate your profit monthly. You objective here is to keep your expenses as low as possible, and your revenue as high as possible to increase your profit margin as you develop your business. When you consider investing in CPD, I would always recommend improving either your translation/interpreting skills, or one of these five aspects of your business to improve how you do business.

Would you add any other tips to the list to start working as a freelance translator and interpreter? Leave a comment below, I’d love to hear from you!

 

 

 

A feature blog brought to you by David Miralles Perez.

“My name is David Miralles and I am aware of how languages can influence professional environments. Honing communication between two cultures has become crucial in today’s globalised world. And that is what I do by means of my translation and interpreting services. Small and medium enterprises and entrepreneurs can now spread their messages through cultural and linguistic barriers and make a big impact on an international scale.”

Website | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

How To Start Working As a Freelance Translator and Interpreter To Guarantee a Successful and Profitable Career – Part 3

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Marketing: Who are my clients and where are they?

When we talk about marketing, people normally think about a website, business cards, social networks, etc. Yes, that’s great, but without a strategy, there’s no point to have all this.

I’ve seen so many freelance translators and interpreters working really hard to get their websites ready. And then, after launching them… Nothing was happening. No clients, no visitors, nothing. They paid so much attention to a single aspect of their marketing and they ended up forgetting the strategy behind it.

 

 

In a nutshell, marketing is the art of knowing your clients, knowing where they are and what they are looking for, and making them interested in your business.

Your objective must be to attract all these people to your business and make them perform an action before selling your products. As you can see, this is also related to your USP. Without a USP, you won’t be able to identify what clients you want to target.

Answer these questions:

  • What are the biggest concerns of your potential clients?
  • How your services are going to solve their problems?
  • How are you going to present your offer to your clients?
  • Where are your clients and what platforms are you going to use to target your potential clients?

I’ve seen so many people saying that you should be visible everywhere online, because you never know where a client is going to come from. I disagree. You should be where you potential clients are.

For example, for a photographer, it would make more sense to join a platform that enhance visual content such as Instagram, Pinterest or Behance; whereas, Behance may not be the ideal platform for a translators and interpreters, as we don’t really have a visual portfolio to showcase. Analyse where you want to be and make sure that you make the most of your efforts online.

Sales: How a freelance translator and interpreter negotiates and closes a sale.

Another common mistake that I’ve seen so many times before is that translators and interpreters focus too much on the marketing side of their businesses, attracting a lot of potential clients to their websites, but then they don’t close any sales. There’s no point to attract so many people if you don’t have any strategy to convert this potential clients into actual clients.

These are the 4 essential elements that will make your clients buy once and for all:

  • Pricing: Remember that your clients must be willing to pay the prices that you’re offering. Pricing your services too expensive may scare your clients, and pricing your services too cheap will end up not bringing enough revenue to your business. Do you know how much money do you need to earn monthly and annually to have a profitable business?
  • The solution/offer: What you’re offering must be the solution that your potential clients are looking for. There’s no point to sell meat to a vegetarian person. If you’re offering something at an affordable price but your clients don’t need it, they’re simply not going to invest in it.
  • Negotiation: You need to found the common ground between your business and your potential clients to define terms that are beneficial for the two of you. Negotiating doesn’t mean to lower your rates. It means to reach an agreement with your clients. Freelance translators and freelancer without negotiation skills will end up lowering their rates, as it is probably the only strategy that they know to make their potential clients accept a quote. That’s why it is so important to know a few basic negotiation skills.
  • Persuasiveness: My business changed when I started to specialise in copywriting. Copywriting is the art of persuade people to do what you want (to buy, in this case). If you use the right words when talking to your clients, you’ll make your offer more appealing and you’ll be more likely to land a project.

To be continued. Watch this space for next weeks feature (Part 4).

 

 

A feature blog brought to you by David Miralles Perez.

“My name is David Miralles and I am aware of how languages can influence professional environments. Honing communication between two cultures has become crucial in today’s globalised world. And that is what I do by means of my translation and interpreting services. Small and medium enterprises and entrepreneurs can now spread their messages through cultural and linguistic barriers and make a big impact on an international scale.”

Website | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

How To Start Working As a Freelance Translator and Interpreter To Guarantee a Successful and Profitable Career – Part 2

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Be ready to put your business hat on (and hone your skills as you develop your career).

Every freelance translator and interpreter is a businessman/businesswoman. Hence, we need some business knowledge.

That doesn’t mean that we need to know everything about business from the very beginning, but the more you know, the more resources and better decision you’ll make during your career.

Before starting up, I hated to learn about businesses. I felt that that’s not what I wanted to do; at the end of the day I’m a translator and an interpreter because I love languages. Then I realise how languages and businesses intertwine, and started to grasp every business concept and implement them in my own business. Right now, business is probably one of my strongest specialisations, and I’m still learning new things day after day.

But what is a business? (Promise I’m not going to be theoretical here, I’m going to give you practical tips that you can implement from now on during your careers.)

In the words of Josh Kaufman:

“A business (1) creates something of value (2) that other people want or need (3) at a price they’re willing to pay (4) in a way that satisfies the customer’s needs and expectations (5) so that the business brings in enough profit to make it worthwhile for the owner to continue operation.”

As you can see, there are five different fields that all businesses have in common:

  1. Value creation
  2. Marketing
  3. Sales
  4. Value delivery
  5. Finance

Let’s apply these concepts to the freelance translator/interpreter case:

1) Value creation: How a translator and interpreter must differentiate from their competitors.

There’s a lot of competition in the industry. I bet that you’ve heard this sentence before. However, you can make all this competence irrelevant if you differentiate yourself from your competitors.

How can you do that?

You’ll have to develop your Unique Selling Proposition (USP).

Your USP is what is going to make your potential clients decide if they should work with you or not. It’s up to you to let them know what you have to offer that others in your industry can’t. Your USP is going to define what clients you should target your services to.

And how can you develop your USP? Complete these sentences:

  • All translators/interpreters offer translations/interpreting that are
  • Some translators/interpreters offer translations/interpreting that are
  • A few translators/interpreters offer translations/interpreting that are
  • My translation/interpreting services are different because

This will help you to analyse your competitors and realise what other people in the industry are doing to differentiate themselves. This will help you to come up with ideas and strategies to differentiate yourself from all of them. Don’t worry, this is a long process and I’m sure that your USP will develop as you develop your business, but it’s good to think about it from the very beginning so you can have a clearer picture of where you want to get to with your business.

To be continued. Watch this space for next weeks feature (Part 3).

 

 

A feature blog brought to you by David Miralles Perez.

“My name is David Miralles and I am aware of how languages can influence professional environments. Honing communication between two cultures has become crucial in today’s globalised world. And that is what I do by means of my translation and interpreting services. Small and medium enterprises and entrepreneurs can now spread their messages through cultural and linguistic barriers and make a big impact on an international scale.”

Website | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

How To Start Working As a Freelance Translator and Interpreter To Guarantee a Successful and Profitable Career – Part 1

interpreting

 

You’ve been studying translation and interpreting for three or four years. You’ve been improving your languages and even studied abroad for a while. You’ve been working hard to make the most of your university years. And now these are coming to an end. It may seem scary. Believe me, I’ve been there.

I was really scared during my final year at uni when I had no idea what to do next. Some of you may be considering studying a masters or travelling to keep improving your languages, whereas some of you may be starting to look for career opportunities. One of the scariest paths to follow is to start you own business as a freelance translator and interpreter. That’s the one I chose straight after uni.

 

 

Why should you start working as a freelance translator and interpreter?

  • You’re your own boss. You decide the assignments that you want to take, and you’re the person in charge of your professional career.
  • You decide your rates and the clients that you want to work with. You can focus on the specialisations that appeal to you the most.
  • You’ll have more flexibility. You can work as many hours a day as you want, and from wherever you want (as long as you’ve got a laptop and WiFi connection!)
  • You can start working on what you like the most, translating and interpreting, avoiding jobs as a project manager or badly paid internships.

It sounds like the perfect career opportunity, right? Then why are there so many translators and interpreters scared of starting up as freelancers?

 

“I can’t do it” and how our minds are sometimes our worst enemy.

Before talking about tips on how to start your career as freelancers, there’s a not so obvious obstacle that everyone needs to overcome at this stage. As I said, becoming a freelancer is one of the scariest paths to follow when we’re starting up. But that’s not a bad thing if it doesn’t stop us from following our dreams.

Paralysis is an intrinsic feeling that we all have inside us. When we are very scared, we freeze and focus on the fear until it passes by. We don’t act, we don’t do anything but observing the fear. That can be dangerous in the sense that the fear of becoming a freelancer is always going to be there, and that fear may be freezing us not allowing us to act and do something about it. It’s good to be scared. That means change. We’re getting out of our comfort zone and we’re about to act to follow our dreams. When we’re scared we tend to make excuses up to justify somehow this fear.

Ask yourself: Why aren’t you working as a freelancer already? Make a list with all these buts that are stopping you, and try to come up with a solution for each of them.

For example: I can’t work as a freelancer because I don’t have any clients. Solution: I’m going to learn how to get my first client and I’ll find my first client before [insert a specific date]. Since I started coaching freelance translators and interpreters, I’ve come across so many of these buts that are stopping people from acting and developing their businesses. Changing our mindset is very important to make the right decisions, and we need to get rid of all these buts for a good start.

To be continued. Watch this space for next weeks feature (Part 2).

 

 

A feature blog brought to you by David Miralles Perez.

“My name is David Miralles and I am aware of how languages can influence professional environments. Honing communication between two cultures has become crucial in today’s globalised world. And that is what I do by means of my translation and interpreting services. Small and medium enterprises and entrepreneurs can now spread their messages through cultural and linguistic barriers and make a big impact on an international scale.”

Website | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

ISL September Newsletter

ISL banner

Issue no 9, 31/10/16

Welcome to this issue of the ISL Newsletter. We hope that you find the content useful and enjoyable. If you would like to get involved or have some ideas about what we can feature, please email the team on info@islinguists.com.

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Story 1: Unlock your potential, Increase your income and Improve your performance

The International School of Linguists (ISL) are proud to announce that its Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI) has been recognised by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) as one of the qualifications that will allow interpreters to work on all of their interpreting assignments.

The DCI will increase your earning potential, improve your skills and provide a nationally recognised qualification. It consists of 6 mandatory modules, including consecutive and simultaneous interpreting, sight translation and ethics. Read more here.

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Story 2: Language Show Live 2016

You may already be aware that ISL had a stand at this years Language Show Live in London. We are proud to say that this event was a huge success and we had many linguists signing up to our Interpreting Qualifications. Don’t miss out on our fantastic, limited time offer, for this week only. Sign up to our Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting and receive a 10% discount with the code: LSL10L3.

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Story 3: Stress Management for Interpreters

At some point in our lives, we will experience some form of stress. Whether it is occupational or personal, knowing how to deal with the situation effectively and knowing how to de-stress, is the key to our own health and wellbeing. Every interpreter is at risk of stress due to the nature of work they undertake. Our 5 top tips will assist interpreters to manage stress that may arise. Read our 5 top tips here.

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Story 4:How to be an Interpreter: Advice for Newcomers

Interpreting as a career is competitive but rewarding and the demand for interpreters to bridge the language barrier between people and professionals is in high demand, all over the world.

If you are completely new to this and want to know what it takes to get into this field, our 5 steps on how to become an interpreter will send you on your way. Read more here.

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Story 5: CPD for interpreters

Looking to enhance your specialist knowledge? Want to refresh your knowledge in the interpreting field? Or are you simply looking to gain some CPD hours? ISL specialist courses can help you. Browse our list of courses here. We also offer some classroom interpreting workshops. These workshops combine tutor led sessions, group exercises, professional discussions, homework exercises, research activities and hands-on practise sessions to help you to build your knowledge and skills in different interpreting settings. Browse our listings here.

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Stay in touch. If you have any enquires, please email the team on info@islinguists.com.

Facebook. Twitter. LinkedIn.

How to be an Interpreter: Advice for Newcomers

interpreting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interpreting as a career is competitive but rewarding and the demand for interpreters to bridge the language barrier between people and professionals is in high demand, all over the world.

If you are completely new to this and want to know what it takes to get into this field, our 5 steps on how to become an interpreter will send you on your way.

1) Self Evaluate: Is this career path really for you? You need to consider all factors within this job role. What does it entail exactly and how are you going to find work? Can you remain impartial throughout the assignments? Doing extensive research into the field is advised before you jump straight into it. Interpreting can be harder than it looks. 

 

2) Qualifications: You will need an interpreting qualification to become a professional interpreter. The qualifications include the Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting and the Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting. You may also need a certain level of experience and qualifications to work in certain sectors. Research the different interpreting qualifications on offer and how you can obtain these. Researching different education centres will be handy as well as not every centre will fit your wants and needs – for example, we provide mainly distance learning. Writing a development plan may help as you will create some realistic goals when you will be able to start working as an interpreter. 

 

3) Volunteering: Have you got a sufficient amount of experience in Interpreting? Volunteering for your local public services or charities such as the refugee council can be helpful for your community and it can also provide you with great experience. This experience can be applied and used when signing up to different agencies and it will increase your earning potential. If you are looking for organisations that are currently taking on volunteer interpreters, depending on your location, Nottingham University Hospital are accepting.

 

4) Freelance Business: Do you want to work for yourself or through an agency? What do you need to do to be able to set up your own freelance company or to establish yourself as a sole trader? If you would rather work for yourself, as a freelancer, you need to know how to set this up and what makes a good freelance business. Our Introductory Business courses are packed with advice on how to run a successful freelance interpreting or translation business.  Click here.

 

5) Finding Work:  Which areas do you want to specialise in? How far are you prepared to travel to an assignment? What rates are you prepared to work for? You need to decide on the type of work you want to undertake as an interpreter for example: NHS work or Police work. You need to have realistic goals and expectations based on your experience and qualifications and what income you want to get from the job. You also need to consider the area you live in and the languages you speak. There may not be much demand for interpreting services for your language in the area you are currently based. It will be worth considering how far you are willing to travel for an assignment.

So if you want to start your career as an interpreter – what are you waiting for? Use this guide to help you make your first steps into this challenging and rewarding line of work. If you have any further questions about what qualification to take why not email the team at info@islinguists.com.

Unlock your potential, Increase your income and Improve your performance

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The International School of Linguists (ISL) are proud to announce that its Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting (DCI) has been recognised by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) as one of the qualifications that will allow interpreters to work on all of their interpreting assignments.

The DCI will increase your earning potential, improve your skills and provide a nationally recognised qualification. It consists of 6 mandatory modules, including consecutive and simultaneous interpreting, sight translation and ethics.

This qualification is flexible, meaning that you can comfortably study around your existing work and family commitments. You will also be able to directly influence how quickly you qualify. You can start your DCI qualification at any time, in any location and in any language. Expert assessors and language specialists are on hand to guide and support you throughout the qualification.

We have even created a customised option to ensure that our candidates are able to interpret effectively within police, court, prison and probation settings.

On completion of the course and with your permission, we will recommend you to the agencies contracted to provide language services to the MoJ.  Successful completion of the course and registration with The Big Word and The Language Shop will mean that you can earn between £18 and £29 per hour depending on the type of assignment that you will be undertaking

Don’t be put off if you feel that you cannot commit to completing the whole DCI qualification. We have taken a modular approach to the course that will allow you to work towards completing the DCI without having to restart the course. Each module is £300 and this includes certifications and assessments. The full 10 module DCI course is £1195. We offer a number of payment options including payment through instalments.

So if you want to earn more money, improve and enhance your interpreting skills and abilities and want to be exposed to all of the interpreting assignments within the MoJ, why not complete this simple form and express an interest in registering for the DCI course.

We expect there to be high demand for this course and places will be limited. On receipt of your form, one of our team will then be in touch to discuss next steps and answer any questions that you may have.

For general enquiries, please email info@islinguists.com.

Stress Management for Interpreters – 5 Top Tips

Woman freelance working in her home-office

At some point in our lives, we will experience some form of stress. Whether it is occupational or personal, knowing how to deal with the situation effectively and knowing how to de-stress, is the key to our own health and wellbeing. Every interpreter is at risk of stress due to the nature of work they undertake. Our 5 top tips will assist interpreters to manage stress that may arise.

1) Analyse the assignment before accepting it

Find out everything you can about the interpreting assignment before you accept it. You need to know the back ground information, the location, what specialist sector it will be in, what stage the assignment or case is at etc. All of these elements can contribute to stress. The nature of the assignment could have an emotional impact on you and it may be in your best interest if you don’t accept it or the location of the assignment might be on a route that is well known for being congested and you may need to plan ahead to avoid being late. Consider all factors of the assignment before you accept it.

2) Don’t bring work home with you

As hard as this may be, you should try and draw a line between work and home life. Failure to do so, can leave you overthinking/anxious and could have a negative impact on your personal life. You should switch off from work when you get home and spend time with your family and friends. This will allow you to unwind and prepare for the next day ahead.

3) Get enough sleep

Generic I know, but getting the right amount of sleep is actually proven to make you a healthier person. Being tired will make you feel irritable and you will not be able to cope with situations that arise in assignments. Introduce a routine (if you haven’t already). On average, you should be getting 7-9 hours of sleep. Set an alarm 15 minutes before you should be going to sleep as a reminder to unwind and get ready for bed.

4) Have ‘me’ time

Having time to yourself also plays an important role in your health and wellbeing and actually reduces stress. It is good to reward your self after a hard days work. Have a long hot bath, relax on the sofa with a hot drink and read your favourite book. Other people like to take up hobbies such as yoga or walking. Calming, classical music has also shown to be effective in distressing.

5) Take a break

Booking a holiday or a break is important, as it helps to maintain that balance of work and home life. Getting away from work for a short while will allow your brain to rest and focus on yourself and your family/friends. It will help you to switch off from work and you can return feeling refreshed and motivated.

 

If you want to know more about handling stressful situations and how to maintain your health and wellbeing as an interpreter, take a look at our “Your Wellbeing for Interpreters and Translators” course. This can be found here.

 

Blog written by Tess Wilkinson – L&D admin at ISL. Copyright belongs to the owner.

ISL September Newsletter

ISL banner

 

Issue no 8, 26/09/16

Welcome to this issue of the ISL Newsletter. We hope that you find the content useful and enjoyable. If you would like to get involved or have some ideas about what we can feature, please email the team on info@islinguists.com.

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CCS
 
ISL's Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting has been nominated for 2 E-Learning awards and has made the shortlist for the final.
 
Read more about this huge success here.

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CPD for Interpreters

 

At ISL we recognise the importance of continuous professional development and being a member of the ITI, we are happy to announce that we offer 10% off our specialism courses for linguists that are also ITI members. 
 
 

Woman freelance working in her home-office

 

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Upcoming Events
 
ISL offer a number of classroom interpreting workshops that are essential for your continued CPD and will also be making an appearance at the Language Show Live in London.
 
 
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Increase the Amount of Work You Get Within the Public Sector

 
You might have read in the news that the CCS framework has recently been awarded. This is big news for interpreters working in the Public Sector because it can have an impact on the type of work opportunities that you will receive and the diversity of the work that you can fulfil.
 

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Did you know you may be eligible for tax deductions on the training you are undertaking? 

If you're self-employed and the purpose of the training is to up-date your existing skills and expertise, you may be able to claim for tax deductions. An example of an eligible candidate would be a self-employed interpreter who has already undertaken Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting and is seeking to complete a Level 4 or Level 6 to up skill their knowledge.

For more information, click here. To contact the team, please email us on: info@islinguists.com

 

 

 

 

 

Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting Shortlisted for Two Awards

award nominations l3

ISL is excited and extremely proud to announce that our Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting qualification has been nominated and shortlisted for not just one, but two E-Learning Awards!

In August, we were notified that our Level 3 qualification is a finalist in the Training Journal Awards 2016 in the category ‘Best Private/Commercial Programme’

If that wasn’t pleasing enough, yesterday (7th September) it was announced that the same Level 3 qualification has also been shortlisted for the Learning Technology 2016 Awards in the ‘Best Online Distance Learning programme’ category.

This is amazing news for ISL and even better news for our students, as it confirms that the nationally recognised ISL qualifications are recognised as a quality provision, setting us apart in the industry and confirming the high standard of our qualifications.

To be nominated for both awards, ISL fought off competition from over 300 international training providers so to be finalists is an achievement in itself, regardless of what happens next.

The winners are announced at the end of November, so keep your fingers crossed that we become double award winners.

Why not celebrate this tremendous achievement with us by enrolling on our double award nominated course? ISL are offering you 10% off our Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting for 1 week only. On and between the dates 8 – 15th of September, the cost of the Level 3 qualification will be just £580.50 and you can spread the cost using one of our popular, interest-free instalment plans. T&C’s apply*.

Happy Studying!

 

*Terms and Conditions: The 10% discount is only applicable once the application process is successful. Offer ends on the 15th September at 11:00pm. For enquiries, please email the team on info@islinguists.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The marketing advice every new freelancer needs

Freelancer working in the garden. Writing, surfing in the internet. Young girl. Relax and joy.

Freelancing doesn’t come easy but offers plenty of benefits such as, flexibility, chance-to-be-your-own-boss and work across a diverse range of projects. I don’t write this as a freelance expert (I have no claims on that!) but as a marketing professional with advice for marketing your brand.

I will start by saying that marketing yourself is a tough assignment and this is with all of my knowledge of marketing theory and practice. So whether you do or don’t have marketing experience you are likely to be exploring new ground with brand ‘you’. Here are my tips for getting your brand out there:

 

1) Assess yourself

It is important to fully understand your skills and identify what makes you unique. Draw up a basic SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) to see what you have to work with. Use the ‘Opportunities’ section to consider areas you could develop with training or work experience.

Focusing on your ‘Strengths’, number each one you have listed to indicate which you believe is your strongest (#1) down to the weakest of your strengths. This may seem like a strange exercise but it will bring your Best Selling Point (BSP) to the fore. Pin this list to a wall because this is the information you will use to market yourself.

2) Check out the competition

You may know your BSP but it is important to be sure people want what you are selling. Take a good look at the people out there offering similar services, see what they are promoting and how they do it. Jump into groups that include the kind of people you believe are looking for your services and see what questions they are asking. Add a post telling the group you are setting up as a freelancer and ask if your services would be of interest to them.

3) Create your identity

Now you know what you need to communicate, you require an identity that will help people find and remember you. This may require a small investment but a strong identity will serve your freelance business well. For your identity consider the following:

  • Your business name
  • Brand logo, colours, font
  • Offline – business cards, letterhead, presentation template
  • Online – Domain name for website, blog and social media

Before settling on a name, consider how it will work as a domain name for your website and how it will appear on smaller formats such as business cards and social media icons. A name that indicates what you do is a great way to be found online. Unless you have design skills it is likely that you will need to pay for this expertise (a great way to utilise a fellow freelancer!). Your name and logo is your brand identity. Work this into your website, blog and social media so that all of your communication channels look consistent.

4) Market your brand

Armed with marketable skills and brand identity, you are ready to get yourself out there. Allocate time in your work schedule for marketing yourself as this will be a continuous process. In the first instance you will have to invest a good bit of time to get established which can be reduced once your business goals have been met.

  1. a) Website 
    This is your key selling tool, make sure it looks great and communicates exactly what you can do for your customers. Link back to your website as much as you can because this will help to increase the number of visits you receive. If you can keep up to a blog, this is a great way to attract people to your website. Use copywriters to help with content should you need help.
  2. b) Social Media 
    Just like your website, ensure your chosen social media pages are looking good and get busy with your posts. If you are running a blog, announce new articles and don’t be afraid to share relevant 3rd party information – give them credit too! Join in conversations with targeted people and organisations to get your business noticed. Be sociable and regularly interact to grow your following.
  3. c) Network
    Online or offline, all networking activity is useful for marketing yourself. Search for relevant groups online and join discussions to share expertise and learn new things. Always be gracious and help others to promote products or services you have found useful.

Go for it!

It has never been a better time to be a freelancer with so many marketing tools freely available. The biggest investment you will need to make is your time, it may feel slow at first but results will begin to show. As I said at the beginning, you may not find marketing yourself easy but develop a brand personality that you can jump into and make sure as many people as possible know you are there.

 

This blog was guest-written by Rebecca Greenwood

Freelance marketing expert, approved copywriter and social media manager.

Connect with Rebecca on LinkedIn or visit her blog for similar articles.

Increase the Amount of Work You Get Within the Public Sector with our Top Tips

CCS

You might have read in the news that the CCS framework has recently been awarded. This is big news for interpreters working in the Public Sector because it can have an impact on the type of work opportunities that you will receive and the diversity of the work that you can fulfil. Because of this news, ISL have produced a guide to the CCS framework that covers:

  • What the CCS framework is
  • How you can get work through the CCS framework
  • What the eligibility criteria is
  • How you can be considered for a wider range of opportunities

 

What is a Framework?

A framework is an agreement with contractors to establish the terms on major contracts that may be awarded. In other words, it is a general term for agreements that set out terms and conditions for making specific purchases.

 

 

What is CCS Framework?

CCS stands for Crown Commercial Service and their framework names the different contractors that EG: If a school needs paper, it lists the companies they can buy paper from. Not only is this extremely helpful for the public service employees, it saves some of the tax payer’s money. thebigword have been awarded the contract to provide interpreting services to all public services through the CCS framework. These public services include the NHS, Education, Immigration services, Social Service, welfare benefits, mental health  and the department of work and pensions. When one of these public services want to book a linguist in the future, as thebigword have won the contract, the service will call thebigword and they will source a linguist with the appropriate skills and experience. This means that if you want to be considered for this work, you ideally need to be registered with thebigword to be considered for selection.

 

thebigword Entry Requirements

To register with thebigword you require:

  • Experience: a minimum of 100 hours of public service interpreting experience
  • Qualification: Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting or higher

After you have registered with thebigword, you will automatically be eligible to work on the assignments that the CCS framework brings. However, if a client using the CCS framework asks for a specific linguist, (e.g. a school rings up and asks for an interpreter for a parent and teacher conference that has experience interpreting in the education services and holds an education specialism course/qualification) you will not be offered these types of assignments if you do not meet the specification. If broadening your horizons, becoming more desirable to clients and being eligible for more job opportunities is something you are interested in, then ISL can help.

 

How to Diversify Your Opportunities

As mentioned, when thebigword receives a request for a linguist, they will select someone with the appropriate qualifications, skills and experience in that public service. If you have limited experience in one or more of the public services, you can increase your opportunities and get a wider variety of work by learning more about additional public service specialisms. You can do this in many ways but one method is to take a training course that focuses on the particular specialism that you want to learn about.

 

What Next?

If you are interested in working on CCS opportunities and already meet the requirements, then you can contact thebigword to register with them here.

If you want to learn more about qualifications and specialisms through ISL you can do so here.

 

For any enquires, please contact us on info@islinguists.com.

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Advance Your Career and Save up to £119 on an Interpreting Qualification

August and September are the times of year when we look forward to getting back to our studies, learn new things and look forward to a bright future. With ISL, you can go ‘back to school’ and study a range of Interpreting courses, workshops and qualifications via Distance or Classroom learning. Exclusively, with this email you will receive 10% off your ‘Back to School’ preparations.

Qualifications

If your preference is to study in a supportive, tutor-led, classroom environment that allows you to achieve a qualification in a set time frame, our classroom courses are perfect for you.

Our nationally recognised community interpreting qualifications are suitable for bilingual people of all abilities, from those who are just starting out in the profession, practising interpreters who want to deepen their knowledge and add to their skills to those who are established and want to learn new specialisms to enhance their work opportunities.

school accessories

Starting in September 2016:

  • Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting: the entry level qualification, 3 – 12 weeks to complete and priced at £645.
  • Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting: for practising interpreters who do not yet have a qualification, 4 – 16 weeks  weeks to complete and priced at £796
  • Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting: for those already practising, part qualified or just starting out, this level includes law interpreting, 6 – 24 weeks  to complete and priced at £1194.

Places on these classroom courses are filling up fast.  Register your interest today to avoid disappointment. Save 10% on any of the above classroom qualifications, exclusively with this email. Enter the coupon code in the enquiry form on the course page: bck2skwl.

Workshops

If you are not looking to add a new qualification to your résumé, but still want to enhance your work opportunities, CV, skills and knowledge why not consider one of ISL’s facilitator led workshops?

These workshops will allow you to learn new skills and specialist information that can help you to find new work opportunities and increase the quality of your work. It will also give you a chance to meet other professionals in your field, learn from their experiences and exchange tips and advice.

 

“The workshop was well detailed and extremely useful!”

“The workshop was extremely practical – I could follow the information step by step”

 

ISL workshops include Police Interpreting, CPD for Interpreters, Business Skills for Interpreters, Court Interpreting and many more so for an up to date agenda, please click here.

Save 10% on any of the above workshops, exclusively with this email. Enter the coupon code upon checkout to receive your discount: bck2skwl.

Not For You…?
 
If your commitments prevent you from attending a classroom session, you can still obtain one of our high quality qualifications taking our popular distance learning option. Use the voucher code for 10% off.
Take a look at our Distance Learning Interpreter Qualifications here.

Competition!

Purchase any of the above ISL courses for a chance to win a £30 WHSmiths or Amazon voucher. This voucher can be used to purchase all of your ‘back to school’ essentials.

Once a purchase has been made and received, your name will be entered into a draw and the winner will be announced on Sept 1st 2016.

Terms and Conditions: If purchasing a classroom or distance learning qualification, entry of the competition is subject to successful completion of the registration process and payment. To be entered into the draw, purchasing of courses must be made during August (1st – 31st).

TJ award picture

ISL’s Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting Shortlisted for the TJ Awards 2016

ISL were delighted to learn that their Innovative Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting has been shortlisted for the Best private/commercial programme category at the Training Journal’s 11th TJ Awards.

Established in 2006, the purpose of the Training Journal Awards is to promote excellence, best practice and innovation in Training and Learning & Development, and to highlight the importance of this area in today’s business climate. This demanding area of business is arguably the critical success factor for future growth and competitiveness for many organisations. Therefore the role of those responsible for delivery and management of Training is vital. For this reason it is absolutely right for the Learning & Development profession to have a cross industry national event to recognise, promote and honour excellence, professionalism and outstanding achievement.

The TJ Awards are now recognised as the premier Training and L&D event for the UK. The range of Award categories is designed to recognise the most important activities within Training and Learning & Development.

According to Training Journal, “the quality of this year’s nominations has been higher than ever. Our teams of judges had a real challenge picking out the top entries, so this is an achievement (ISL) can already be proud of”.

The Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting is up against some stiff competition in the same category, from giant multinational companies including AIG, TSB and Bank of Ireland. The full list of finalists in the same category are:

  • AIG/Alpha Development
  • Bank of Ireland with Accenture
  • Daniel Swarovski OrganisationAG/The Conversation Space
  • International School of Linguists
  • Style Group Brands, A20 Coaching and Your Business In Mind
  • TSB/Blue Sky Performance Improvement

This nomination underlines ISL’s commitment to developing and delivering innovative, high quality training packages to existing and aspiring Interpreters and Translators across the UK. Hundreds of students are already benefiting from the provision of practical, achievable and accessible qualifications that deliver what they promise.

The Awards ceremony is scheduled for the 6th December, when the winners will be announced.

The full shortlist for all the categories has been announced on the TJ Awards Website.

Click here to learn more about the ISL Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting.

Source: https://www.trainingjournal.com/articles/partner_article/tj-awards-2016-shortlist-announced

Language company thebigword to recruit 3,000 after signing £120m Ministry of Justice deal

Global language services company thebigword has today signed the biggest interpreting contract in Europe – a deal worth up to £120m to provide face-to-face, telephone interpreting and translations to the Ministry of Justice in the UK.The international business, which employs more than 550 people from 11 offices around the world and already has 8,000 linguists, will now begin recruiting more than 100 new support staff at its headquarters in Leeds, England, and more than 3,500 language experts.

thebigword won the contract to provide expert linguists to organisations across the Justice System, including HM Courts and Tribunals Service, National Probation Service (NPS), Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), HM Prison Service (HMPS) and others. Senior management have now signed the contract after finalising negotiations with Government officials. Staff at thebigword have worked with linguist feedback groups to make sure they see improved working conditions and attractive pay and benefits. Linguists will also be able to access accredited training programmes and take work from thebigword’s 7,500 other public and private sector clients around the globe.

Chief executive of thebigword, Larry Gould, says: “The Ministry of Justice decided to work with us because we have the experience, infrastructure and world class technology. We already work with a range of large-scale public sector organisations around the world and they know they can trust us to deliver. “This is a fantastic deal for thebigword and further cements our position as the largest interpreting services provider in Europe. We have people and offices on every continent and we will continue to push for contracts like this in the private and public sectors as we continue to grow the business. “We are extremely proud of the work we do breaking down language barriers around the world every day and are now looking forward to helping deliver justice in the UK. It’s also fantastic to be welcoming thousands more skilled Linguists to thebigword family.”

Under the deal, thebigword will help improve efficiency across the Ministry of Justice by delivering dedicated online portals that seamlessly and instantly connect linguists with clients needing language support.Additionally, the MoJ contract requires the development of a trainee scheme, in conjunction with the Independent Quality Assurance supplier, which will provide career opportunities for new and existing linguists.

The new services commence from October 31 this year and all linguists and staff will be contacted in the coming weeks to be welcomed to thebigword.

If you are interested in working as an interpreter for MoJ but do not hold the required level interpreting qualification, check out our Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting, which is recognised by the MoJ as a qualification to hold in order to work for them.

If you purchase any of our classroom and online qualifications and workshops during August, you can receive 10% with the code bck2skwl. Your name will also be entered into a draw to win a £30 gift voucher.

Read more here.

For enquires, please contact info@islinguists.com.

Copy right: www.thebigword.com

ISL August Newsletter

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Issue no 7, 13/08/16

Welcome to this issue of the ISL Newsletter. We hope that you find the content useful and enjoyable. If you would like to get involved or have some ideas about what we can feature, please email the team on info@islinguists.com.

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four graduate standup with happy emotion and floating hat.

 
ISL would like to congratulate the following students for their hard work and successful completion on our Level 3 and 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting:
 
- Renata                      - Anna 
- Lina                           - Aurelia 
- Kristina                      - Yaowamart
- Dalia                          - Amaina
- Anna                          - Jelena
- Milada                        - Agnieszka 
- John                           - Claire 
- Zeynep                       - Victoria 
- Magdalena                 - Tahir 
- Sabeen                      - Ilona
- Yassmin                     - Anna
 
Well done and all the best for the future!

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Save £119 on courses with ISL's 'Back to School' promotion

September is the time of year when we look forward to getting back to our studies, learn new things and look forward to a bright future. With ISL, you can go 'back to school' and study a range of Interpreting courses, workshops and qualifications via Distance or Classroom learning.

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Current Vacancies

We have the following vacancies available at ISL:

  • Tamil Language Specialists
  • Interpreting Quality Assessors

For more information on each role, please click here. 

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 Earn As You Learn

Woman freelance working in her home-office

 
Earn money and become a qualified Assessor with the International School of Linguists. By joining the ISL Earn as you Learn Assessor program, you can earn between £17 and £20 per hour and become fully qualified and find work as a Qualification Assessor, a Language Assessor and a Quality Assessor.
 

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Did you know you may be eligible for tax deductions on the training you are undertaking? 

If you're self-employed and the purpose of the training is to up-date your existing skills and expertise, you may be able to claim for tax deductions. An example of an eligible candidate would be a self-employed interpreter who has already undertaken Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting and is seeking to complete a Level 4 or Level 6 to up skill their knowledge.

For more information, click here. To contact the team, please email us on: info@islinguists.com

 

 

 

 

 

Could you help crack the language barrier at Nottingham’s hospitals?

05 August 2016

Volunteers fluent in a second language are being sought by the interpreting and translation service at Nottingham's hospitals.

Every day patients with a wide range of language needs are treated at the Queen's Medical Centre and City Hospital - and assistance is often needed to help them communicate with healthcare professionals.

The interpreting and translating service at the hospitals offers assistance in over 50 different languages from Arabic to Russian - with much of the support provided by volunteers. The service provides face-to-face interpreting, telephone interpreting and written translation.

Renata Towlson from the interpreting and translating service said: "I am seeking volunteers interested in working in demanding clinical environments.

"As our patients speak so many languages, there are no particular limitations to our search.  If you are bilingual or perhaps even multi-lingual and would like to share your skill in the community, please come forward and make yourself a voice to somebody's need.  Whether you can commit five or 50 hours a month, we are keen to hear from you.

"There are many benefits of getting involved. It's an opportunity help ensure the language barrier is no longer a problem for a patient in accessing the right treatment at the right time. You will get a basic interpreting training and ongoing support, and we can also support you towards becoming a qualified community interpreter."

One person who has had a hugely rewarding experience volunteering as an interpreter at the hospitals is John Cipko, pictured above.

Born in Nottingham to Polish parents, John grew up speaking both English and Polish - and decided to start volunteering with the interpreting and translating service in 2014, having taken early retirement following a 32-year career with the NHS as a Biomedical Scientist.

In his first year in the role, John volunteered a total of 770 hours - and gained such a glowing reputation that he now has paid employment with the hospitals on a freelance contract.

He said: "When I decided to retire I wasn't sure what to do with my time. But someone suggested I could use my language skills to help people - and that's how I ended up getting involved with the interpreting and translation service.

"I really enjoy the work that I do. The satisfying thing is feeling like I've helped people, and getting thanked not just by the client but also the doctors and consultants. They often tell me that without my help they would have struggled to help the patient.

"If you're a young person looking to pursue a career in languages it's a great way to get experience; or if, like me, you've retired but still want to keep busy, it's a very fulfilling way to help others."

If you are interested in finding out more about volunteering with the hospitals' interpreting and translating service, please contact Renata Towlson on 0115 9691169 (extension 76146), or via email at Renata.towlson@nuh.nhs.uk

john cipko

 

 

 

 

 

 

Save up to £119 on an interpreting qualification with ISL’s ‘Back to School’ Promotion

September is the time of year when we look forward to getting back to our studies, learn new things and look forward to a bright future. With ISL, you can go 'back to school' and study a range of Interpreting courses, workshops and qualifications via Distance or Classroom learning. Exclusively, with this email you will receive 10% off your 'Back to School' preparations.

Qualifications

If your preference is to study in a supportive, tutor-led, classroom environment that allows you to achieve a qualification in a set time frame, our classroom courses are perfect for you.

Our nationally recognised community interpreting qualifications are suitable for bilingual people of all abilities, from those who are just starting out in the profession, practising interpreters who want to deepen their knowledge and add to their skills to those who are established and want to learn new specialisms to enhance their work opportunities.

school accessories

Starting in February 2017:

  • Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting: the entry level qualification, 3 - 12 weeks to complete and priced at £645.
  • Level 6 Diploma in Community Interpreting: for those already practising, part qualified or just starting out, this level includes law interpreting, 6 - 24 weeks  to complete and priced at £1194.

Places on these classroom courses are filling up fast.  Register your interest today to avoid disappointment. Save 10% on any of the above classroom qualifications, exclusively with this email. Enter the coupon code in the enquiry form on the course page: bck2skwl.

Workshops

If you are not looking to add a new qualification to your résumé, but still want to enhance your work opportunities, CV, skills and knowledge why not consider one of ISL's facilitator led workshops?

These workshops will allow you to learn new skills and specialist information that can help you to find new work opportunities and increase the quality of your work. It will also give you a chance to meet other professionals in your field, learn from their experiences and exchange tips and advice.

 

"The workshop was well detailed and extremely useful!"

"The workshop was extremely practical - I could follow the information step by step"

 

ISL workshops include Police Interpreting, CPD for Interpreters, Business Skills for Interpreters, Court Interpreting and many more so for an up to date agenda, please click here.

Save 10% on any of the above workshops, exclusively with this email. Enter the coupon code upon checkout to receive your discount: bck2skwl.

Not For You...?
 
If your commitments prevent you from attending a classroom session, you can still obtain one of our high quality qualifications taking our popular distance learning option. Use the voucher code for 10% off.
 
Take a look at our Distance Learning Interpreter Qualifications here.

 

 

Competition!

Purchase any of the above ISL courses for a chance to win a £30 WHSmiths or Amazon voucher. This voucher can be used to purchase all of your 'back to school' essentials.

Once a purchase has been made and received, your name will be entered into a draw and the winner will be announced on Sept 1st 2016.

Terms and Conditions: If purchasing a classroom or distance learning qualification, entry of the competition is subject to successful completion of the registration process and payment. To be entered into the draw, purchasing of courses must be made during August (1st - 31st).

ISL July Newsletter

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Issue no 6, 22/07/16

Welcome to this issue of the ISL Newsletter. We hope that you find the content useful and enjoyable. If you would like to get involved or have some ideas about what we can feature, please email the team on info@islinguists.com.

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frau am arbeitsplatz macht sich notizen

ISL recently held a competition via our Facebook page. We wanted to hear your thoughts on Distance and Classroom courses and how you learned best. We were excited to announce that our competition winner was Noreen Hussain! 

She expressed to the team that her preferred way to learn was via Distance learning and therefore won a place on one of our online training courses. Well done Noreen! A big thanks to everyone else who got involved, it was great to hear your thoughts.

Read the Distance vs. Classroom learning blog here.

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Did You Know...?

12% of all languages on earth are spoken in one little country: Papa New Guinea.  They boast around 840 living languages!

 

 

 

papa new guinea

 

 

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Current Vacancies

We have the following vacancies available at ISL:

  • Slovak Language Specialists
  • Interpreting Quality Assessors

For more information on each role, please click here. 

 

curriculum vitae or resume

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Language Show Live - London, 2016.

language show live

ISL is pleased to announce that we will be attending the Language Show Live 2016 in London in October. Language Show London is Europe's largest exhibition for anyone with a passion for languages. The show is spread across 3 days (14th, 15th & 16th) and the event will offer you the chance to attend over 60 CPD certified seminars and workshops, visit stands featuring products, services and offers that will help you in your career and network with thousands of other language teachers, learners, translators and linguists who love languages as much as you. Better yet, you can meet members of the ISL team and it is its absolutely free to attend! 

Sign up for your free tickets here.

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Blogs and Posts

Keep up to date with us and check out our most recent blogs, written by Tess Wilkinson, the Learning and Development Administrator from ISL.

Are NUS cards really worth buying?

5 Top Tips for those Wanting to Become Freelance Interpreters

- Distance Learning vs. Classroom Learning

 

Woman freelance working in her home-office

 

 

 

 

Our Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI) Membership

ITI WEB-JPG-Logo-192x192-72dpi

ISL are very pleased to announce that we are now a corporate member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI).

 

Who are ITI?

The Institute of Translation & Interpreting (ITI) is the UK’s only dedicated association for practising translation and interpreting professionals. ITI has over 3000 interpreter and translator members who specialise in more than 100 languages and dialects from around the world. They maintain the ITI directory of qualified professional translators and interpreters, who have been assessed according to their strict admission criteria.

 

What does this mean for me?

Since its foundation in 1986, ITI has worked hard to ensure the values and reputation of its members are upheld; the Institute is recognised as representing the highest standards in the profession of translating and interpreting, and its name is trusted and respected both in the UK and internationally. ITI offer all it’s members networking opportunities, event and workshop discounts, personal development support and access to the members’ area on the ITI website. ITI highly encourages CPD so a list of registered and certified CPD courses and qualifications will also be available to you.

 

What next?

For more information on ITI and what they do and offer, click here or to apply to become a member, click here.

 

Contact ISL on info@islinguists.com if you have any questions or for more information. 

Are you a qualified and experienced linguist? Do you want to take your career to the next level?

We are pleased to announce that we are working closely with The Language Shop on an exciting new Ministry of Justice (MoJ) contract. The Language Shop are an experienced supplier of language services to the public sector and have recently been selected by the MoJ as the preferred bidder for an innovative quality assurance role.

A key part of the role involves carrying out assessments of linguists’ provided by other suppliers working across the justice sector. This includes courts, the police, probation services and prisons.

The Language Shop are therefore seeking suitably experienced and qualified linguists to help with this work. If you meet one or more of the following criteria, they would really like to hear from you:

* Experience in assessing language professionals.
* An assessor qualification.
* An Interpreting qualification
* Significant experience providing language services to the justice sector.
* Other relevant qualifications or experience.
Contact info@islinguists.com for more information on how to apply.

ISL June Newsletter

ISL banner

 

Issue no 5, 12/06/16

Welcome to this issue of the ISL Newsletter. We hope that you find the content useful and enjoyable. If you would like to get involved or have some ideas about what we can feature, please email the team on info@islinguists.com.

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Alan Ng

Alan Ng, one of our Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting students, proudly holding his qualification certificate with the Manager of ISL, Robert Mynett, after he visited us in our office in Leeds.

Well done Alan!

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Continuous Professional Development

One of the most effective ways to gain new skills, expand your knowledge to diversify your work opportunities and enhance your CV with Continual Professional Development (CPD), is to take a training course. If you don't have the time or money to complete a full Interpreting qualification to enhance your CPD then our course bundles are perfect for you.

interpreting2

ISL's course bundles are a great way to learn new skills, refresh your knowledge and find new interpreting opportunities at a pace that fits in with your busy schedule.

Browse our course bundles here.

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Language Show Live - London, 2016.

ISL are pleased to announce that we will be attending the Language Show Live 2016 in London in October. Language Show London is Europe's largest exhibition for anyone with a passion for languages. The show is spread across 3 days (14th, 15th & 16th) and the event will offer you the chance to attend over 60 CPD certified seminars and workshops, visit stands featuring products, services and offers that will help you in your career and network with thousands of other language teachers, learners, translators and linguists who love languages as much as you. Better yet, you can meet members of the ISL team and it is its absolutely free to attend! 

language show live

Sign up for your free tickets here.

 

 

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ISL Interpreter Workshops

ISL offer a range of interpreting classroom workshops in our training facility in Farringdon, London and in Leeds. These workshops specialise in different topics such as business interpreting, ethics and police and court interpreting and are facilitated by experienced, expert tutors

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Click here to browse our list of workshops.

Our offerings change all the time so remember to check back often to see what is new. If there is a workshop or webinar that you would like us to create let us know by emailing info@islinguists.com.

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Blogs and Posts

Keep up to date with us and check out our most recent blogs, written by Tess Wilkinson, the Learning and Development Administrator from ISL.

Are NUS cards really worth buying?

5 Top Tips for those Wanting to Become Freelance Interpreters

 

Woman freelance working in her home-office

 

 

 

 

Distance Learning vs. Classroom Learning

Continuous professional development is an important part of people’s lives and the best way to self-develop is through education. Education is split into two categories; Distance and Classroom. Distance learning is when a course or qualification is presented online on a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and can be completed in your own time, at your own pace and in an environment that suits you. Generally in distance learning, there is less support from a tutor and more self-study. Classroom learning is when a course or qualification is presented in a physical classroom at a set location and you are required to attend the course certain days and times during the week. You are supported by a tutor throughout. Many people speculate whether distance learning is just as effective as a classroom course and in my opinion, it is. There are many benefits to distance learning as there is with a classroom course and I am here to split down the pros and cons on both methods of learning.

DISTANCE LEARNING

Pros:

1. Flexible: distance learning allows you to study at a time and place suitable for you.
2. Convenience: you can fit studying into your daily routine and schedule.
3. Self-study: distance learning gives you some independence allowing you to study with rules that work best for you.
4. Cost: the overall cost is cheaper as you don’t have to spend money on travel arrangements.
5. Time: Less time is spent travelling to and from a classroom location.
6. Review: It is easier to review the content as the materials will be exactly the same when you revisit as they were first time.

Cons:

1. No teacher: there isn’t a teacher to guide you throughout your studies.
2. Motivation: depending on the sort of person you are, motivation to study at home can be impacted as you have more distractions.
3. Social Interaction: there can be less social interaction with a distance learning course.
4. Time: the time to complete a distance learning qualification may be more as you are doing it alongside your current commitments.

CLASSROOM LEARNING

Pros:

1. Support: there is a teacher present in a classroom course providing you with face to face support.
2. Group study: you can interact with other students, swap tips and ask them for help.
3. Time: generally, because a classroom course has a set schedule, you may find that you finish it quicker than a distance learning course.
4. Understanding: your understanding of the subject may be stronger as you have someone to sit down and go over it with you.

Cons:

1. Independence: depending on the type of person you are, you may find it patronising having a teacher telling you what to do and may prefer to do independent studies.
2. Travel: you have to travel to the classroom and it may not always be within a suitable distance.
3. Convenience: the set days of study may not be convenient for you due to other commitments.
4. Cost: due to travel and other arrangements, it may cost you quite a bit more money to attend a physical classroom location.

Distance learning would be more advantageous for me as there aren’t many schools or colleges close to my home. I would have to pay for travel arrangements on top of my tuition. I like the independency and convenience also as I work full time.

The type of study you chose should depend on how you work and learn best, convenience and cost.

To conclude, both distance and classroom learning have their pros and cons which should be taken into account before you chose to study a course, whether it is a qualification or a short training course for your CPD.

Blog Credit: This blog is brought to you by Tess Wilkinson of ISL.

5 Top Tips for those Wanting to Become Freelance Interpreters

Registering as an interpreter can be a daunting task, especially if you have little or no experience in the sector. As with most jobs, a requirement is to have “At least 1 year experience in the field” but how are you supposed to gain experience when nobody will take you on, due to lack of experience? It’s a catch 22 situation.

As an Interpreter, I am sure you will have come across this situation when applying for jobs, especially now the industry standard is to have a Level 3 Qualification under your belt. Here are our 5 top tips for Interpreters before joining the workforce:

interpreting2

1. Research

Is this career path really for you? Are you fluent enough in 2 languages to interpret accurately? Do you mind working varied and flexible hours? Are you willing to travel? Can you take on last minute assignments? These are all areas for consideration before choosing Interpreting as your career path. You may be asked to interpret in a hospital one day where a member of someone’s family is being diagnosed with a serious or life threatening illness. This is a very emotional and distressing position to be in and you must remain impartial. A thorough research into the field is needed before jumping straight into it and deciding whether this is for you.

2. Agency or Freelance?

You need to decide whether you wish to work for an agency or work for yourself in your own freelance business.  Freelancers work independently and directly with clients. Agencies employ freelancers to work individually and together on projects for clients. An agency acts like a middle man; they will find the work for you to do rather then you finding it yourself.  Finding work through an agency is easier but can pay less. Another option is to start up your own agency and employ freelancers yourself but this will take more planning and you need to find the clients to keep your freelancers happy.

Have a look at our Introductory Business Skills courses here. They are designed to help you to get your freelance business up and running.

3. Entry Requirements

What are the entry requirements to work professionally as an interpreter? Do you need any qualifications? Do you need a certain amount of experience? Do you have to be a specialist in the different sectors such as Health, Police or Education etc.? It is your responsibility to find out what you need to do and prepare before you apply with an agency or set your own business up.

Have a look at our Interpreting Qualifications and Courses here.

4. Career Plan

Where do you see yourself in 5 years’ time? Having a realistic career plan is essential for personal growth and development. Once you have figured out if this industry is for you, whether you want to register with an agency or work freelance and whether you need to be qualified, map out a career plan and track your progress against it. How long does it take to be qualified? Which agencies do you want to register with? How many assignments do you wish to have undertaken in one years’ time? Will you increase your rates the more experienced you become? What do you need to in order to successfully run your own freelance business?

5. CV

A crucial part of applying for jobs, is having a current, relevant and professional CV. If you don’t have a CV, write one! Here is a great site on how to write a CV. If your CV is out of date, update it! Be sure to add all of your skills, experience and job history. It is also ideal to have a portfolio or folder of all your qualifications and certificates. When I was searching for a job, I found it very useful to have all of my qualifications, certificates and CPD records to hand, in one place. It saved me from scrambling around my bag pulling out crumpled paper. It also makes you seem more organised.

curriculum vitae or resume

Job searching can seem intimidating if you don’t prepare yourself for challenges along the way. If you follow our 5 simple top tips, the hunt for a job will seem less daunting and more rewarding.

To summarise:

  1. Do your research
  2. Do you want to be self-employed or work for an agency?
  3. What do you need before you can become a professional interpreter?
  4. Map out your career goals and objectives
  5. Have an up to date CV

 

 

Written by Tess Wilkinson

Learning and Development Administrator

ISL

Are NUS student cards worth buying?

NUS

ISL have recently registered as a centre with NUS allowing our Interpreting students to purchase an NUS extra cards giving them access to thousands of savings every day, but is it really worth it? An NUS extra card costs a total of £12 (£13 if you include delivery charges) and a lot of people are put off the idea of buying a student card, especially at this price, because they wonder “will I really save as much money as I am spending on this card? Is it really worth it?” Well the answer is yes! I was curious to see how much I would actually save, and being a part time student myself studying a Foundation Certificate in Marketing, I ordered an NUS extra card.

Not only was the registration process quick and simple but the delivery of the card was speedy, allowing me to begin saving within a week of ordering. I quickly began to realise that I could pretty much save anywhere I shopped. The first saving I made was at Co-Op! Round the corner from my house, conveniently, is a Co-Operative foods store and with an NUS card, you can save 10% on your basket; whether you’re just buying a meal deal for your lunch, as I was, or you have your weekly shopping to do. The meal deal I purchased was £3.20, (not too bad for a chicken and bacon sarnie, a snack and a drink) and although the price of my basket wasn’t high, I could still use my NUS card. I saved a total of 32p – not that impressive I know. However, with Co-Op being so local and convenient to me, it’s my go to; whether I need to satisfy my chocolate cravings or purchase plasters for my aching feet after a night out, so overall so far I’ve saved around £10 with my NUS card just shopping at Co-Op alone.

If you’re a pizza lover like me, you will appreciate this next saving. The second saving I made with my NUS student card was with Domino’s. Now as most of you will know, Domino’s pizza is way overpriced but is very delicious. When I found out I could save a whopping 25% at Domino’s I was straight on it as I’d never actually ordered one before, because of the price. It was my turn to pay for the takeaway (my boyfriend paid for the last one) and with an amazing 25% off my order, I was definitely winning. I saved a total of £10.17 using my NUS extra card. Already, I have saved more money than the NUS card is actually worth and any other savings after this is pure “profit”.

hands taking slices of pizza

I was delighted to find out that one of my favourite high street fashion shops, New Look, accepted NUS student cards and I could save 10% on my purchase. My third saving was on some work clothes. I was in dire need of some new work trousers and because I knew I could save 10% I treated myself to a nice work blouse also. My savings came to a total of £4.20.

Like many others, my absolute worst fear is the dentist. After my most recent visit to the dentist I was told the cliché “You don’t brush your teeth properly” so I decided to take action (mainly so I don’t have to go as often because I really do hate the dentist). Superdrug had a brilliant sale on ‘everything Oral B’. After filling my basket up with dental care products, I asked the cashier if they accepted student cards and her answer was ‘yes’! Not only was I saving money on the Oral B sale but even more so with my 10% off. I saved a total of £7.50 just by using my NUS card.

My most recent saving is my favourite one yet. My favourite place to shop is the popular online fashion retailer, ASOS, and with my holiday to Cape Verde being less than a month away (not to brag or anything) I thought it was time I started my holiday shopping. The total of my basket was £83 which included a mix of summer dresses, shorts and swimwear; I was over the moon to learn that they also accept student cards. I entered my student card number and the price of my basket dropped to £74.40. Another brilliant 10% discount with my NUS card saving me a total of £8.30.

Aerial view of Praia city in Santiago - Capital of Cape Verde Islands - Cabo Verde

As you can tell, I have most definitely got more than my money’s worth with my NUS student card and I will be doing a lot more saving in the very near future (this weekend to be precise; I am going to Giraffe Burgers and Cocktails for a catch up with my friends. They also offer 10% off your food bill!).

There are many more shops and places that accept NUS students cards and if you are a student, full or part time, you will notice a huge difference to the amount of money you spend on everyday essentials, supplies for college or University and simple things such as travel or a meal out with a friend.

Cost of card: £13

Savings so far (one month after receiving card): £40.17

This equals a profit of £27.17! Already!

So in answer to the original question, it is definitely worth getting a NUS card! Apply for an NUS student now for guaranteed savings.

 

 

23/05/2016

Written by Tess Wilkinson

Learning and Development Administrator at ISL

All copyright belongs to the owner.

Success Stories

Its always great to see students complete the qualification that they set out to achieve and see the benefits that this brings to their life.

Have a look at what some of our students had to say when they had successfully completed their qualifications with the International School of Linguists;

David Tkac – Level 3 Certificate in Community interpreting

Have you enjoyed the qualification?

It was one of the more pleasant studies/work experiences I have had yet. General attitude of ISL staff was very good, my assessor was very accepting and great to work with and type of working on a qualification, no strict deadlines and working on assignments only when I decide that it fits my time, was extremely practical.

What has been your experience compared to your initial perception?

The qualification is based on my actual job. It has been much more practical and easier to do than I expected.

Did you progress as well as you hoped prior to making a start?

No, I did not. I was hoping to get it a bit faster, but I started a college and also move out to live on my own so I could not spend as much time on it as I intended to.

What were the biggest challenges you faced?

My own laziness. That is always the biggest challenge.

What would you change about your experience?

I cant think about anything really. I’m quite happy with everything, I think this is the exemplary well prepared and led qualification.

What did you enjoy most about the qualification?

Freedom of choice and very positive attitude of my assessor. She was very helpful and it was always nice to hear her. We could also every time find reasonable time for assignments and role play and observation. My assignments were always marked quickly and I didn’t have any big problems during the qualification because she already told me everything in a very long phone call at the beginning of the qualification. The full information is always the best way to start something new.

Is there anything that you would like to see more or less of in the qualification?

I would probably like to see less of those tiny writings through the course. I’m not exactly the type of person who would enjoy writing few words every few minutes, but they were in moderate amount so I could cope.

I would enjoy seeing more of the general theory to read online when logged in and maybe some book to order and read. We are living in the modern age of laptops and tablets but book is still the best feeling thing in hand.

How has completing this qualification impacted on your life?

I feel more confident in my everyday job and it also gave me more confidence in my private life. I can do many more things in one day at work and I don’t need to constantly worry if I do something wrong and watch myself closely.

I feel also a bit proud what is the best final effect. I feel more confident as a person so I don’t need to focus on myself and I can do my best to help others and I cope with stress much better. It might sound a bit odd at first, but I know myself as a person and I wouldn’t work on the qualification if I didn’t see it as satisfying and making me look a bit better in my internal view of myself.

What advice would you give to anyone thinking of taking on this qualification?

Go for it. Consider your lifestyle, job, time and effort you want to put in it and go for it. It can lead to unexpected options.

 

What is next for you?

After completing this qualification, I have the chance to try to teach adults life skills in English. There are communities which struggle with writing CV´s, booking appointments or travelling to embassy in London. This can be shown to them in a very simple way, especially when you went through the same struggle and you also know how to present and explain things. I have also a TEFL certificate for teaching so I can work with them on a few levels. I can give them truly bilingual information and at the same time I should be able to build up their language skills. It feels good.

I’m also about to finish my GCSE in English and Maths what is going to open another access to a different variety of job roles. The constant work on oneself is hard but it pays off in a variety of surprising and beautiful ways.

Alan Ng – Level 3 Certificate in Community interpreting

Alan was one of our star students, finishing the Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting within a 2 months, which is our quickest completion time yet! We interviewed Alan shortly after he completed the qualification and in summary, here is what he had to say about his experience with ISL:

 

Q: Have you enjoyed the qualification?

A: Yes! I enjoyed it very much. I liked sharing my work and experiences throughout the assignments.

 

Q: What has been your experience compared to your initial perception?

A: At first, I thought the course would be very easy. Although the course was useful, I misjudged the amount of writing, typing, studying and researching.

 

Q: What were the biggest challenges you faced?

A: My computer skills are not as advanced so I thought the researching and typing tasks proved most difficult.

 

Q: How has completing this qualification impacted on your life?

A: I am so proud to have achieved this qualification. I feel confident enough to move on in my career as a community interpreter knowing I am qualified. 

 

Q: What advice would you give to anyone thinking of taking on this qualification?

A: From my experience, I would definitely say work hard and try not to take a break in the qualification. Complete it while the information and knowledge is still fresh in your mind.

 

Q: What is next for you?

A: I would very much like further my skills through eduction and training with the International School of Linguists. So professional and supportive. I had support provided to me from 7:30am right through to 18:00pm regardless. I would highly recommend ISL.

BBC Radio Nottingham Interview

Renata Towlson, has launched a voluntary interpreting team for the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust which could help save and improve lives. Photo: MATTHEW PAGE BULWELL: 2 Durham Crescent, NG6 9AH.

On Friday 10 July, Renata Towlson, one of our learners on our Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting course, gave an interview to BBC Radio Nottingham. The interview, featured live on the Verity Cowley show, covered the challenges of moving to a new country, becoming an interpreter and also included information on the vital work Renata is doing with the Nottingham University Hospital.

You can listen to a recording of the interview by clicking the player below.

If you would like to learn more about the Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting course, click here.

Appeal for bi-lingual volunteers to help vulnerable Nottingham patients

Appeal for bi-lingual volunteers to help vulnerable Nottingham patients

By PMBlackburn  |  Posted: July 04, 2015

Comments (0)Language lovers are being urged to volunteer to help give people a voice in the city’s hospitals.A voluntary translation scheme has been set up at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust – which runs the Queen’s Medical Centre and City Hospitals – and has already helped more than 1,000 patients.But the scheme, which started last September, is currently only catering for Polish speakers who have come to Nottingham and Renata Towlson, who set it up to ensure the best care can be given to patients who cannot speak English, wants to expand it to ten more languages.

Mrs Towlson, who came to Nottingham from Poland more than 20 years ago and has worked for NUH in the contracts and procurement department for 17 years, said: “There is a lot of support needed for people who have a very limited knowledge of language and those who can’t speak at all.

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“The voluntary interpreting team can improve communications between doctors and patients, and potentially assist in saving and improving lives by avoiding common mistakes from misinterpretation between languages and cultures.”

The scheme runs alongside a paid for translation service at the hospitals, but Mrs Towlson, who lives in Bulwell, said it is needed as the NHS simply cannot afford the amount of translation patients need.

Currently there are around eleven staff in the hospital who volunteer to help whenever they are needed but mother-of-one Mrs Towlson said she hoped members of the public would now come forward to help.

She said: “It is a privilege to be a channel of communication between the clinician and the patient. It’s extremely rewarding. You can put people’s minds at rest and they can express themselves. I feel it’s quite a unique way to get into the fabric of our society you really start to gel and understand where people are coming from.”

After having the idea last year, Renata has been able to make a difference after the trust moved her to a new job where she is in charge of the hospitals’ contract with an external provider for translating services and developing voluntary services and she took on a recently launched course at the International School of Linguists which trains interpreters for working in the public sector.

She is also being sponsored to complete the course by The Big Word – the company who provide freelance translation services to the hospital.

Mrs Towlson said: ” I work full time, and I’m a busy mother and wife who hadn’t studied in 25 years, so I was nervous about starting a new qualification. However, ISL courses are all flexible and designed to be completed at a pace and time which suits the student. My new qualification has given me the ideal time, resources and learning at home support to help train our volunteers.”

Robert Mynett, general manager of ISL said: “The course is designed for practising interpreters who want to increase their work opportunities and diversify their career. Our unique approach to training means the Level 4 Certificate can be carried out as a vocational qualification so linguists have the flexibility to earn as they learn, perfect for a full time working mother like Renata.”

And Matthew Lowe, director of UK sales at The Big Word, said: “We are committed to supporting and engaging with our linguists at a community level, equipping them with the tools and skills they need to deliver high quality interpretation and translation work. We’ve partnered with the ISL for many years and it’s been fantastic to be able to sponsor Renata to help her achieve her Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting. We’ve also worked with Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust for a number of years and look forward to supporting this fantastic voluntary interpreting team in the future.”

If you can volunteer to speak Polish, Urdu, Hungarian, Romanian, Punjabi, Arabic, Farsi, Czech, Cantonese, Slovak or Turkish you can get in touch with Mrs Towlson at Renata.towlson@nuh.nhs.uk or on 07812268800.

Read more: http://www.nottinghampost.com/Appeal-bi-lingual-volunteers-help-vulnerable/story-26832852-detail/story.html#ixzz3f7FQ92a5
Follow us: @Nottingham_Post on Twitter | NottinghamPostOnline on Facebook

IOE corporate member – thebigword – vows to transform the language industry

ISL have received a mention on the Institute of Export blog (http://www.export.org.uk/blog/ioe-corporate-member-thebigword-vows-to-transform-the-language-industry). You can click the link to read more or find the majority of the article below:


 

Interpreting more than two million minutes of speech in 300 languages and translating approximately 35 million words is an impressive feat for any company, but IOE corporate member and global language communications business, thebigword, is aiming even higher.

The business has just unveiled ambitious plans to position itself alongside the likes of Facebook and LinkedIn – and have one billion people accessing its technology by 2020.

Founded 35 years ago, the Leeds-based, language translation provider employs 600 people and utilises a network of 8,000 linguists to provide translation (written word) and interpreting (spoken word) services across the globe.

Technical innovation and integration with existing technology are the key growth strategies set out by the business. Operating across a number of diverse sectors, the company provides translation and interpretation services to 80 per cent of the top 100 global brands, supporting businesses such as Unilever, Electrolux and Harley Davidson and organisations including the NHS, Home Office and MOD.

In addition to attracting a billion users, the company’s dynamic growth strategy entails growing its current £48 million turnover by £175 million in the next five years, and increasing its international workforce by 30 per cent.

Larry Gould, founder and CEO of thebigword, outlines his business vision, saying “We will work in partnership with our clients to deliver solutions that will enhance their global trade through integration with our technology, processes and services.

“We are no longer just as translation and interpreting business, but a technology-driven communications partner helping clients unlock global markets.”

Over the past three years thebigword has invested 30 per cent of its profits back into technological development and has committed to continue to spend £1–2 million on technology annually to spearhead its growth.

Joshua Gould, thebigword’s Chief Commercial Officer, said: “We are working on ‘game changing’ technology such as instant email applications – which translate messages in an inbox at the click of a button, on-demand translations by humans, responsive mobile applications providing machine translations and voiceovers, and a community interpreting tool which creates an online marketplace for linguists.

“These innovations will mean that anyone with a smart phone will have access to 3,000 interpreters, speaking more than 350 languages in their pocket. “

Highlighting the benefits of their company’s IOE membership, Larry Gould added: “Being members of the IOE provides access to like-minded organisations and offers a great opportunity to assist businesses with their export strategy from a linguistic and cultural perspective.

“We also value the educational partnership between the IOE and the International School of Linguists, which has resulted in the offering of cultural and linguistic modules to sit alongside the export modules, providing a unique qualification for the student.”

Ambitious plans indeed, but as the adage goes – ‘fortuna favorece a los valientes!’

Useful Tips for Public Service Interpreters

At ISL we know how difficult it can be to work as an interpreter in the public services. We have compiled 5 useful tips to help and support you.

tips for public service interpreting v1

 

We would like to add to our top tips, so if you have any useful ideas that you would like to share please let us know on our Facebook page which is listed below:

ISL official Facebook

 

Top 6 Reasons Why Learners Love Distance Learning…

According to ‘The 2012 Survey of Online Learning‘ the number of students taking at least one online course has now surpassed 6.7 million. Check out our visual below for reasons why Distance Learning is fast becoming the most popular way to learn.

6 reasons why learners love DL v1

 

Learners on our Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting agree with this. See what they had to say about our online qualification:

  • “It gave me the chance to extend my skills”
  • “I liked the relevance and standard of the course materials”
  • “Very useful information, gives me all I need”
  • “Well organised learning material”
  • “The modules covered relevant terminology.

If you are interested in the benefits of Distance Learning and would like to further your career in interpreting, apply now using the link below:

Apply for the Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting

 

 

Earn As You Learn Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting

RESERVE YOUR PLACE NOW

I am bilingual, or fluent in a second language, and I would like to be considered for this qualification, [contact-form-7 id="2564" title="Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting sign up"]

Are you bilingual? Are you hoping to start a new career without needing the funds available to pay hefty course costs? Would you like to gain a professional qualification and start working immediately?

If so, this is the perfect option for you.

If you want to start a new, rewarding career as an interpreter, ISL's Earn As You Learn qualification is the ideal place to start. Once you are accepted onto the course*, you will be able to start studying for the Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting Qualification.

At the same time, you will gain experience working as an interpreter on entry level paid assignments. the money that you earn from these assignments will pay for the qualification and will also give you an income.

By the time you have received your qualification, you will have amassed enough experience to move on to more complex interpreting assignments and earn higher rates of pay.

Places are limited, reserve yours by completing the form on this page.

You can find more information on the Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting course below.

*To be accepted onto the course, you will need to complete the full application process, including an English proficiency test, and you will need to commit to completing the qualification within a maximum of 12 months.

Description

What jobs will I be able to do?
Face to Face interpreter
Telephone Interpreter

In these roles, you could earn between £10 and £17 per hour (source: http://www.prospects.ac.uk).

When can I start?

You can start the process today by filing in the sign up form below. Once completed, you could start the qualification within days.

How long does it take?

The average length of time taken is 3-6 months, but you can complete it quicker if you already have skills, knowledge or experience of interpreting.

Are there any requirements?

To successfully join this course, you need to have native speaker competence in your target language and as a minimum you must have Level 2 (Advanced level, GCSE A*-C or roughly B2 of the Common European Framework) in all areas of your English language competence.

What will I learn?

The Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting will teach you the basic skills and knowledge that you will need to be become an interpreter. It explains the code of conduct and legalities that you will need to work to as well as the different forms of interpreting. You will also choose a number of areas that you want to specialise in when completing interpreting assignments.

How many credits is the qualification worth?

A minimum of 16 credits to pass the qualification.

Unit breakdown

Mandatory units

Unit 1: Preparing for Community Interpreting Assignments

Optional units

Unit 2a: Planning to work as a Community Interpreter within Educational Settings

Unit 2b: Planning to work as a Community Interpreter within the Health Service

Unit 2c: Planning to work as a Community Interpreter within Mental Health Services

Unit 2d: Planning to work as a Community Interpreter within Social Services

Unit 2e: Planning to work as a Community Interpreter within Immigration Services

Unit 2f: Planning to work as a Community Interpreter within Housing Services

Unit 2g: Planning to work as a Community Interpreter within the Welfare Benefits System

Unit 3 Supporting Interpreting through Sight Translation

Unit 4a: Interpret Two Way

Unit 4b: Interpret Two Way

Unit 5: Development your own Performance in Community Interpreting

Unit 6: Working as a Community Interpreter in Public Services

What support will I have?
Personalised Individual Learning Plan
Career Guidance
High quality course online course materials
Optional one-to-one mentoring support via phone, email and online
Affiliate Membership with ISL
Access to regular webinars and workshops
24-hour access to our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
Guidance and support from you assigned, qualified Assessor

How will you assess me?

The Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting is a vocational qualification, which means that you will be assessed by demonstrating your ability to do the job through various assignments.

Can I apply for funding or discounts?

To make our qualifications as accessible as possible, all of our students can choose to pay by interest free installments, meaning you can earn as you learn.

For information on funding and discounts, please click here.

How do I apply?

You can get started with your qualification today by completing the contact form below. One of our team of experts will call you back to give you further details and tell you what is next.
30 day money back guarantee if you are not completely satisfied
Course Fee: £595 (payable in interest free installments by request)
Distance and Blended Learning
Approx 6 months to complete
Accredited Qualification

What is the registration process?

At ISL, we want to be confident that everyone who is accepted onto our qualification has the right skill, knowledge and ability to be able to successfully complete the learning experience. There are also certain things we need to do to be able to register you onto a nationally recognised qualification.

In total, there are 6 steps in the registration process, which are pictured below. At each step in the process we will give you clear instructions about where you are and what you need to do next and you can ask us questions whenever you feel the need to make the process as simple as possible.

The first step in the process is to register your interest, by filling in the form at the bottom of this page.

The International School of Linguists unveils new public sector qualification

Certificate in Community interpreting linked in

LEADING linguist training provider, The International School of Linguists (ISL), has launched a new qualification for interpreters working in the public sector.

The Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting has been specifically designed to equip linguists with the skills they need to work in the public sector. This new qualification effectively bridges the gap between the training already on the market, giving public sector interpreters the opportunity of developing their knowledge and skills in specialisms including health, social services, housing, and immigration, helping them to deliver a higher quality of service.

It is designed for practising interpreters who want to increase their work opportunities and diversify their career. It also provides the ideal foundation for those who wish to progress toward providing interpreting for legal services, including the Police and courts.

Robert Mynett, general manager of ISL, said: “Interpreting requirements in public sector bodies, such as the NHS, police and local authorities has increased significantly over the past decade with millions of pounds being spent each year on interpreting services.

“There are fantastic opportunities for linguists working in the sector and this qualification will help them to work toward higher level interpreting assignments, such as legal work, as well as giving them the tools to run a successful freelance interpreting business.”

The Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting is currently exclusive to ISL, in partnership with Ascentis. It is designed for interpreters who already have 50 or more hours of interpreting experience, or those who already have the Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting and want to further their skills.

Rob explained: “We identified a gap in the market for this level of qualification; it’s been uniquely created to help linguists define and develop a career path in the public sector. It will support and empower them to confidentially complete more complicated assignments such as court work and police interpreting services.”

The new ISL qualification has been welcomed in the industry as providing a much needed stepping stone between entry level qualifications and higher level diplomas. Leading technology-driven language solutions company, thebigword, is sponsoring five of its linguists to complete the Level 4 qualification as it continues to grow its public sector work.

ISL’s unique approach to training means the Level 4 Certificate can be carried out as a vocational qualification so linguists have the flexibility to earn as they learn. It will provide a mix of knowledge based and practical learning, teaching business management skills such as finance and marketing. It will also give linguists the tools to specialise in areas such as health, education and criminal justice.

ISL was founded five years ago to raise the standards of linguists through training and testing. Flexible payment options are available for all its courses and can be taken anywhere in the world, in a time and place convenient to linguists.

For further information on the Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting click here, or to register your interest in other ISL quailifications, browse our course catalogue, call 0800 7573 475 or follow ISL on twitter for updates @ISL_Official


For press enquiries and case study requests, please contact Lucy Oates or Emma Johnson at RMS PR.

Telephone: 0161 927 3131

Email: lucy@rmspr.co.uk or emma@rmspr.co.uk

Funding Your Training

ISL’s programmes are not eligible for 24+ Advanced Student Loans yet, however, you may be eligible for other types of funding depending upon your circumstances.  We do offer staged payments to support your studies and discounts for those who are eligible.  Please contact us for more details.

Adult learners can apply for grants and bursaries to help pay for courses and training or the costs of living through the training period. Usually, with a grant, you don’t have to pay this money back.

For most grants and bursaries you apply directly to the organisation that gives them out. They’ll have an application form and will be able to tell you if you qualify.

If you’re a parent, you might also be able to get help with childcare costs while you study.  Please note, however, that ISL are not funded by the Skills Funding Agency and this may effect your application.  If you are unsure discuss this with the Department of Work and Pensions.

Searching for Education Grants

Family Action provides information about education grants and has a grant search.

Further information on grants can be found at Turn2Us.org.uk

This is a grant search that will allow you to enter your personal details and searches your local area.

For further, more general information, you may find Money Saving Expert also useful.

You are advised to read the publications by the Directory of Social Change (DSC) that will be available in your local library as well.  They may have further information on potential sources of support.

More General Information

Course-Specific Grants

City & Guilds offer bursaries to people who study for a City & Guilds qualification.

Dance and Drama Awards are available at some specialist private schools and help with fees and living costs.

The General Federation of Trade Unions Educational Trust has grants for students of economic theory and history, industrial law and industrial relations.

If you are training:

New Community Interpreting Qualification to Meet the Demand for Higher Skills

  • Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting is being exclusively provided by the International School of Linguists.
  • The new qualification offers specialist pathways to learners.
  • Qualification answers CBI’s call for ‘earn as you learn’.

10 November 2014 – Public sector employers can be confident their interpreters will be able to cope with the demands of professional interpreting after the creation of a new qualification, from the International School of Linguists (ISL), which teaches important business skills and allows linguists to specialise in areas such as health, education and criminal justice.

The qualification meets the recommendations in a newly-published CBI report that says employers are increasingly expecting higher levels of skill from their workforce, with half of all jobs expected to require workers to have completed a level 4 education or higher by 2022. It calls for more ‘earn as you learn’ training and an emphasis on vocational skills which are the cornerstones of the new qualification.

The Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting is being exclusively provided by ISL in association with Ascentis, and has been developed to equip linguists with the skills they need to work successfully in the public sector.

After completing the qualification, interpreters will have demonstrated competency in managing a variety of situations and behaviours they will come in to contact with. The option to choose a pathway allows linguists to gain specialist skills and to build a career as a competent interpreter in environments such as the criminal justice system and social services, with the potential this brings for increased employment opportunities.

Robert Mynett, General Manager of ISL, says: ‘Interpreting is much more than being able to understand a second language, it’s a skill that has to be developed, and the Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting has been designed to provide linguists with the tools they need to succeed in this highly competitive business.

‘By allowing learners to specialise in various pathways, they will become well equipped to succeed in different environments, and additional modules in finance, marketing and promotion will allow them to take their own business forward.’

The Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting is a vocational qualification, offering a blend of knowledge based and practical learning. It teaches skills in how to successfully start and run a business, and allows learners to choose pathways in sectors including education, health, social services, immigration and criminal justice.

It is available to those who are already working as interpreters and have at least 50 hours of experience, or those who already have the Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting and wish to gain a further qualification.

For further information on the Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting, or to register your interest in other ISL qualifications, visit www.islinguists.com or call 0800 7573 475.

Updates on the course will be posted on Twitter: @ISL_Official and LinkedIn: International School of Linguists.

Ascentis Announce Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting

Ascentis is delighted to announce that their new Level 4 Certificate in Community Interpreting has been approved by Ofqual and is available for delivery from 1st November 2014.
The certificate consists of 23 credits and has been developed in line with the National Occupational Standards in Interpreting.  This is qualification is aimed at experienced interpreters who want to gain a higher interpreting qualification.
ISL are proud to be the exclusive provider of the Level 4 qualification at the present time. If you would like more information about this course, please email Robert.Mynett@islinguists.com

ISL Helping Ebola Crisis

The International School of Linguists (ISL) is working with medics due to fly out to Sierra Leone to provide training in language and the cultural issues of dealing with Ebola victims and their families.

ISL has appointed a Sierra Leone national, who is also a qualified tutor, to carry out the training, which provides basic language skills in Krio and cultural information. This will help the medics deal with the sensitive situations presented by people with Ebola and their families, to help the recovery of patients and also to prevent the further spread of the disease.

Rob Mynett, General Manager of ISL, says: “In Sierra Leone it is customary to wash the body of a deceased relative.  If that person has died of Ebola then this is not possible, which causes tremendous stress.

“Our training has been developed to ensure that medics are aware of these issues and are able to deal with them with compassion and understanding.”

Alongside the training, ISL has created a pocket guide to basic phrases in Krio which include greetings and questions about symptoms that could signal a case of Ebola, along with cultural advice and advice on how to make patients and their families more comfortable.

The International School of Linguists has already trained 207 military medics and is now in discussions to provide training to the various relief organisations working to fight the epidemic.

International Translation Day

International School of Linguists celebrates International Translation Day

The International School of Linguists (ISL) – which creates and delivers accredited courses supporting thousands of professional linguists and businesses across the world – is celebrating International Translation Day, 30 September.

The language services profession is becoming increasingly essential in an age of progressing globalisation and international trade. ISL recently became an Ascentis Recognised Centre, enabling it to launch a range of accredited courses that qualify linguists to undertake paid professional interpreting assignments for the public sector.

ISL has already released its first recognised qualification – Level 3 Certificate in Community Interpreting – and ISL is set to unveil a raft of newly created accredited translation courses in 2015. Robert Mynett, General Manager of the International School of Linguists, says:  “The language services profession is predicted to be worth $47 billion by 2018. “The demand for professional translators and interpreters is growing with it an equal pace. Translation is a vital resource, whether in relation to legal procedure, translating website content  or even translating product manuals.” “International Translation Day is important because it recognises and celebrates the enormous contribution the linguist community is making to education, business and everyday life in an increasingly global age.”

International Translation Day is celebrated each year on 30 September, on the feast of St. Jerome, the Bible translator considered as the patron saint of translators.

Notes to Editors: The International School of Linguists (ISL) is an independent learning organisation and Ascentis Awarding Centre, providing unrivalled expertise in linguistic assessment, training and nationally-recognised Accreditation. Since being established in 2010, ISL has created and delivered courses to support thousands of linguists and clients across the world. Its expertise enables corporate clients to protect their brands and both corporate and public-sector organisations to protect people working in challenging environments.

Vacancy – ISL Language Specialist

ISL Language Specialist

ISL are currently looking for Language specialists to help out with the accredited courses.

The details on the role are outlined below. if you are interested in the role please register your interest by completing the form at the bottom of the page

Role Description

Role Title:  Language Specialist

Job Role:  To  determine competency in language skills for the purposes of assessment of learners against the National Occupational Standards, and record this on relevant documentation in accordance with centre guidelines. .

Reporting to:  Accreditation Manager and allocated assessor

Duties

1. To plan, advise on the evidence and assess performance of allocated learners through observation of competence in the workplace in accordance with the Centre’s Assessor Handbook.  This will involve ensuring that:

  • The assessment plan, created by the assessor, is followed accurately.
  • The learner and assessor receives prompt, accurate and constructive feedback both verbally and in writingIf the learner has failed to demonstrate competence against the performance criteria all relevant records on the VLE is completed and the assessor and learner advised as soon as possible.
  • Attendance at a minimum of 2 standardisation meetings annually is a requirement.
  • A record of continuous professional development is maintained and submitted annually to the Accreditation Manager.
  • An up-to-date CV is maintained and submitted annually to Accreditation Manager.
  • Records of assessment are submitted in a timely manner upon request of Accreditation Manager, Centre Manager, Internal Quality Assurer and Assessor

2. To contribute to the Centre’s Quality Assurance processes:

3. To attend External Quality visits conducted by the Awarding Body as and when required.

4. To take responsibility for continuous professional development as assessor language specialist and within the field of occupational competence.

5. To adhere to and assist in the review of the Centre’s Health and Safety, Equal Opportunities, Quality Assurance and Staff Development policies.

A Language Specialist must:

  • Be occupationally competent as an interpreter in the specific language required. This means that each assessor must be capable of carrying out the functions covered by the units they are observing or reviewing, according to current sector practice.
  • Maintain occupational competence through clearly demonstrable ongoing Continuous Professional Development
  • Have knowledge of the appropriate setting; the regulation, legislation, codes of practice for the service and the requirements of national standards at the time of assessment
  • Take a role in the assessment of observed learner performance, under the guidance of the assessor.
  • Take responsibility for assessing the specific learning outcomes and assessment criteria  as agreed with the Accreditation Manager and assessor.
  • Be supported by the Accreditation Manager including allowance in their workload for this task and continued support enabling them to fulfil the role
  • Be supportive of equal opportunities and anti-discriminatory practice for all learners
  • Be willing to participate in further training and agreed meetings with Internal Quality Assurers/external verifiers, in order to keep up to date and maintain the required standards of assessment
  • Be committed to the ethos of work based learning.

 

 

[contact-form-7 id=”3431″ title=”ISL Language Specialist sign up”]
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Your Career Progression Plan

View CPP exampleAre you a Professional linguist who would like to be able to maximise your earnings? Do you want to become an interpreter or translator but don’t know where to start? Are you an experienced linguist who wants to take the next step in your career?

At the International School of Linguists we do more than provide training, testing and qualifications. Our approach is different for every learner thanks to your Linguist Career Progression Plan (CPP).

Completed with the help of expert linguists and based on your experience, skills, knowledge and goals, your CPP acts as a career guide, giving you feedback on your skills and providing the support you need to take your career in whichever direction you like.

Along with recommended online courses and webinars, classroom based workshops and suggestions on where to find work you can also access one to one support  from our expert linguists.

The Linguist Career Progression Plan is an ideal starting point for linguists who are serious about having a successful career.

To see an example of a typical Linguist Career Progression Plan click here.

Available for all linguists working on UK assignments, it costs just £20.00 to have a Linguist Career Progression Plan created by an ISL expert, including a free Core CPD course.

Buy Now

Click on the ‘Buy Now’ button below to pay with PayPal and get started with the next step in your career immediately!

Contact Us

If you prefer to get in touch with one of the team to get further information or to ask any questions, please contact us using the details below:

info@islinguists.com

0800 7573 475


 

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ISL Course Catalogue

ISL offers a wide range of courses for linguists. Click on the latest courses to learn more about them, or browse our catalogue of courses using the categories below. You can also search for courses using the search function above.

 

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Welcome to the Linguist Lobby.

Choose which function you would like to use from the options below.

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Please note: You need to log into the ISL website to use these functions. Not registered? Why not sign up now for FREE?

Do you want an Exciting, Fresh Challenge?

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thebigword

Experienced freelance Interpreters needed in the below languages and locations

Do you want an Exciting, fresh challenge?

Looking for a, flexible freelance role that suits your lifestyle?

If you’re customer focused and dedicated to your work then we would love to hear from you!

Here are some of the benefits of working as a freelance Interpreter with thebigword:

  • Working hours to suit you, day, evening, and weekends
  • Assignments in the health/local government/legal sectors
  • Be part of a friendly multinational community of freelance linguists
  • Competitive rates and travel policy package

To meet our criteria you need to have extensive public service interpreting experience, proficient English, and a valid DBS (CRB). We will be able to offer you different assignments depending on your qualifications, experience and availability.

We are looking for the following linguists:

  • Latvian
  • Russian
  • Nepali in Surrey
  • Gujarati in Gloucestershire
  • Albanian in London
  • Bulgarian
  • Somali
  • Romanian
  • British Sign Language Interpreters
  • Vietnamese in Sussex
  • Japanese in Bristol/Cardiff

All applicants must also be based in the UK.

To hear more, please get in touch by completing our online application form or speaking to a member of our team.

What works for you, works for us – sign up today by filling in the online application below:

[contact-form-7 id=”1759″ title=”Job Application Form”]

 

Stellar Linguists and Cutting Edge Thinkers to Change the Face of Advertising!

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thebigword

thebigword is looking for talented reviewers for an exciting, fast-paced program with a high-profile, internationally-renowned client.  This is a unique opportunity for anyone looking to collaborate on innovative projects with the most brilliant professionals in the field. Candidates should be available for an initial 5-10 hours per week potentially rising to 20-30 hours of work per week following an assessment period. Experience with transcreation, crowdsourcing and social media strongly preferred.

You are a native speaker with excellent written communication skills in the following target language: Serbian Cyrillic

You are a fast learner, excited about adapting to new processes and technologies. You are a natural editor with a maniacal attention to detail and a keen ear for readability across a variety of disciplines, from IT to marketing, from comics to advertising and everything in between.

If this description fits you and you would like to join the team, please fill in the online application below:

[contact-form-7 id=”1759″ title=”Job Application Form”]

 

Latvian Interpreters Wanted

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Connect2Staff

Latvian Interpreters

Due to Connet2Staff’s continued success and growth, they are looking for Latvian interpreters able to work on a range of ad hoc and ongoing interpreter assignments.

These interpreter roles will primarily be across Kent, so please only apply if you are able to travel to this location. You will need proven interpreting experience and be a UK resident to be considered for this roles.

You must have a recognised qualification in Interpreting, recognised by a body such as the Institute of Linguists, or at least 150 hours of provable experience.

Some of these positions are immediate, so apply today for consideration.

As well as the large number of regular Interpretation and Translation roles Connect2Staff offer across Kent they are now expanding their range of services and engaging with new clients across the South East.

Connect2Staff are already providing quality Interpretation and Translation services to a range of organisations across the county including:
Solicitors firms, Local Councils, Education Services, Immigration, Refugee and Asylum Centres, Charities, Hospitals and GP’s, Police and Prisons, Social Services, Housing Associations and Insurance Companies.
Some of the languages Connect2Staff currently have work for includes, but not limited to:
Latvian, Russian, lithuanian and Romanian.

The role is subject to full referencing and enhanced DBS check.
connect2staff is an agency acting as an employment business and as an equal opportunity agency.

Complete the form below to begin the application process.

[contact-form-7 id=”1759″ title=”Job Application Form”]

 

Lithuanian Interpreters Wanted

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Connect2Staff

Lithuanian Interpreters

Due to Connet2Staff’s continued success and growth, they are looking for Lithuanian interpreters able to work on a range of ad hoc and ongoing interpreter assignments.

These interpreter roles will primarily be across Kent, so please only apply if you are able to travel to this location. You will need proven interpreting experience and be a UK resident to be considered for this roles.

You must have a recognised qualification in Interpreting, recognised by a body such as the Institute of Linguists, or at least 150 hours of provable experience.

Some of these positions are immediate, so apply today for consideration.

As well as the large number of regular Interpretation and Translation roles Connect2Staff offer across Kent they are now expanding their range of services and engaging with new clients across the South East.

Connect2Staff are already providing quality Interpretation and Translation services to a range of organisations across the county including:
Solicitors firms, Local Councils, Education Services, Immigration, Refugee and Asylum Centres, Charities, Hospitals and GP’s, Police and Prisons, Social Services, Housing Associations and Insurance Companies.
Some of the languages Connect2Staff currently have work for includes, but not limited to:
Latvian, Russian, lithuanian and Romanian.

The role is subject to full referencing and enhanced DBS check.
connect2staff is an agency acting as an employment business and as an equal opportunity agency.

Complete the form below to begin the application process.

[contact-form-7 id=”1759″ title=”Job Application Form”]

 

Do you speak Fluent English & any other Language(s)?

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Language Direct Unlimited Limited

Interpreting & Translation in over 189 languages

Registered in England and Wales No. 08331393

90 Matlock Road London E10 6DJ England

Visit us on: www.LanguageDirect.org

Tel:      020 8539 5142

Fax:     020 3298 8621

Email:    bookings@languagedirect.org

Language Direct is looking for interpreters who are native speakers of one or more languages to work on various projects on a freelance basis in various areas in and around the Richmond area. Applicants must meet the following criteria:

1)      Have the right to work in this country.

2)      Have academic or other relevant background.

3)      Have a mobile, sympathetic personality.

4)      Be able to work/communicate at all levels, in non-academic situations.

5)      Have no political, cultural or ethical bias.

6)      Be able to meet deadlines.

7)      Must have successfully completed at least one of the following professional qualifications:

  • Diploma in Public Service Interpreting (DPSI)
  • Foundation Degree in Public Sector Interpreting (PSI)
  • Certificate in Community Interpreting (CCI)
  • Essential Skills & Knowledge in Community Interpreting (Levels 2 & 3)
  • ESOL Community Interpreting
  • Mary Ward Certificate in Community Interpreting
  • Chartered Institute of Linguists Certificate in Bilingual Skills (CBS)
  • Other interpreting qualification at degree level or NVQ Level 4

All interpreters must have a clear CRB/DBS. This is mandatory. We can provide help to candidates who need help with their application for a CRB / DBS.

Language Direct believes in Equal Opportunities for all and expects all candidates to comply and respect this policy.

[contact-form-7 id=”1759″ title=”Job Application Form”]

 

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Public Service Interpreting Accreditation

ISL_PSI_headThis course is designed to develop the skills and knowledge of people who are or want to be professional interpreters. It has been developed through collaboration between academic staff at Leeds Metropolitan University and experts at within the Language Service industry, including interpreters and interpreting users.

It is delivered entirely on-line through International School of Linguists, a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and utilised Leeds Metropolitan University tutors for feedback and guidance. It is aimed at any freelance or practicing interpreter or linguist with competence in at least two languages (one of them English) that want to develop their professional skills as a Public Service Interpreter.

 

  • Vocational Certificate in Public Service Interpreting
  • Vocational Diploma in Public Service Interpreting
  • Professional Diploma in Public Service Interpreting
  • Advanced Professional Diploma in Public Service Interpreting

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Why is Continued Professional Development (CPD) Important?

Continuing Professional Development resizedCPD will help to keep you employable as a professional linguist as well as enable you to progress within your career as you develop new skills and maintain expertise. Ultimately, undergoing CPD is a successful tried and tested career move.

As a linguist, evidence of your commitment to progress as a professional through training and testing programmes will enable you to upgrade your status and highlight your competencies. To help you illustrate you training and course successes, you should record your results in a portfolio. The ISLinguists can assist you to document you skills and training via your profile a notebooks. Speak to your ISLinguists peers to find out how they track their CPD too. You can use this forum or send a message if you wish to discuss this more privately.